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Sugar Linked To $1 Trillion In U.S. Healthcare Spending

Sugar addiction concept as a human head made of white granulated refined sweet cubes as a health care symbol for being addicted to sweeteners and the medical issues pertaining to processed food.

An article in Forbes magazine in 2013 highlighted the Credit Suisse report on sugar which is worth highlighting.

30% – 40% of healthcare expenditures in the USA go to help address issues that are closely tied to the excess consumption of sugar.” Credit Suisse Report

Assuming a U.S. National Healthcare Expenditure of $3 trillion per year – and further assuming we simply take 33% (the lower end of the Credit Suisse range), the calculation is easy. Basically, the U.S. healthcare system spends about $1 trillion per year (and possibly more) fighting the effects of excess sugar consumption.

The health effects around that excessive consumption of sugar include coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Other known risks – mostly around being overweight and/or obese – include osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, gout, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer. A broader summary list of findings in the 40 page report include these:

The 2012 Global Burden of Disease report highlighted obesity as a more significant health crisis globally than hunger and/or malnourishment.

More than half a billion adults (over age 20) worldwide are obese.

The world average daily intake of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is now 70 grams (17 teaspoons).

A scientific statement issued by the American heart Association in 2009 recommends that women take no more than six teaspoons of added sugar a day and men no more than nine.

A single, 12 ounce can of regular soda has about 8 teaspoons of sugar.

While the toxic health effects of sugar are generally well known, there is mounting evidence to suggest that sugar has addictive properties as well.

“Sugar may not pose the clear addictive characteristics of illicit drugs such as cocaine and heroin, but to us it does meet the criteria for being a potentially addictive substance.” Credit Suisse

SOURCE : FORBES 

You and Your Microbiome

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Want to Know How to Snack Smart?

Snacking between meals can keep you from getting too hungry and help you maintain a more consistent energy level throughout the day. The secret is eating the right kind of snacks, ones that will give your body the nutrients that it needs.

Nutrient Intake
It can be difficult to get all of your daily recommended nutrients from breakfast, lunch, and dinner alone. Eating small, healthy snacks between your regular meals can add to that nutrient intake.

Snacking on a combination of fruits and a few nuts can be a great and easy way to introduce more vitamins, antioxidants, and healthy fats into your body. Grain crackers and vegetables can give you a fiber-rich boost, and low-fat dairies can provide an increase in calcium.

Feel Fuller, Longer     
If you’re concerned about snacking because you’re trying to manage your weight, smart snacking with fiber- rich foods is one way to actually help you out.

Take almonds, for example. A one-ounce serving of almonds (approximately 23) contains about six grams of protein, four grams of fiber, and is only around 160 calories.

A healthy snack fills you up with the right nutrients and can actually allow you to stick to a moderate amount of food when you do eat your next meal. High-fiber snacks take longer to digest than other snacks, causing you to actually eat less.

Have a Plan
One of the best ways to avoid reaching for unhealthy junk foods is to create weekly meal plans that account for cravings between meals. Put tasty, convenient pairings—like apples or celery with peanut butter—and healthy snacks such as cherry tomatoes, olives, and pickles on your shopping list.

Just make sure to mix up your snacks. While it’s important to incorporate whole, low-glycemic foods into your diet, it’s easy to fall into a snacking rut and just go for the same old, same old. And boredom can lead to the sugary, empty-caloric dark side.

Plan your snacks and save yourself any post-eating guilt.

Consider These Snack Options:
These delicious and quick snacks are under 300 calories:

4 Tbsp. hummus + 1 large carrot = 170 calories
1 medium apple + 2 oz. cheese = 235 calories
1 oz. almonds (approximately 23) + ¼ c. dried cranberries = 255 calories
1 slice whole-grain bread + ½ an avocado = 260 calories
1 cup Greek yogurt + ½ c. granola = 290 calories
2 Tbsp. peanut butter + 1 banana = 295 calories