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Do Dog or Cat Owners Live Longer?

Do dog or cat owners live longer? If you want to live a longer and happier, consider adopting a pet.

Science shows pet owners are reaping an impressive number of health benefits. These include reduced risk for heart attack and stroke, lower levels of pain, better immune function—and yes, improved longevity!

A large recent Swedish study found that dog owners have a lower risk of death from all causes. Especially those who live without the company of other humans. The conclusion of the study in 2017 was that dog ownership appears to be associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease in single-person households and lower mortality in the general population.

That said, if stress and anxiety are your primary concern, you might opt for a cat because cats appear to be better stress-reducers. A 10 year study of more than 4,000 Americans by researchers at the University of Minnesota’s Stroke Institute in Minneapolis found that owning a cat could reduce your risk of a heart attack by nearly one third.  The finding provoked a mixed reaction from heart experts and veterinarians. CLICK HERE FOR THAT STUDY



Have you heard about Lipoprotein A?

Lipoprotein(a) (also called Lp(a) or LPA) is a lipoprotein subclass. Genetic studies have identified Lp(a) as a risk factor for atherosclerotic diseases such as coronary heart disease and stroke.

The Lp(a) test is typically ordered by a doctor if you have other risk factors for heart disease. Results of this test help determine your risk. Increased amounts of Lp(a) in the body are associated with inflammation in the walls of the arteries. This can lead to changes in the blood vessels, including atherosclerosis. This is a hardening of the arteries.

 

The Deadly Lipoprotein A

Recent research suggests that blood levels of Lipoprotein(a) or Lp(a) may be an important marker for the risk developing of heart disease. However, measurements of Lp(a) are not widely available and are seldom used in routine clinical practice.

The most dangerous particle when it comes to heart disease is genetically-determined, meaning your family gave it you.  Insurance companies often  refuse to pay to have it tested so most of the millions of people who have it are unaware.  It is called “Lp little a or Lp(a).”  It is small and very dense and gets into the lining of the arteries easily.  Unfortunately, neither standard medications for lowering bad cholesterol or nutrition lower the particle.

Lp(a) is a strong risk factor for CVD. However, the lack of clinical trial data has resulted in Lp(a) being largely ignored by clinical guidelines assessing the prevention of CVD.

In 2010, the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) consensus panel recommended screening for elevated Lp(a), in people with moderate to high risk of cardiovascular disease.

Here’s how Lp(a) levels are looked at in terms of risk:

Desirable: < 14 mg/dL (< 35 nmol/l)
Borderline risk: 14 – 30 mg/dL (35 – 75 nmol/l)
High risk: 31 – 50 mg/dL (75 – 125 nmol/l)
Very high risk: > 50 mg/dL (> 125 nmol/l)

You can CLICK HERE and  order your Lipoprotein A test direct for a much lower price and then you can discuss this with your doctor.