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Chile Bans Tony the Tiger in their Fight Against Obesity

The Chilean government, facing skyrocketing rates of obesity, is waging war on unhealthy foods with a host of marketing restrictions, mandatory packaging redesigns and labeling rules aimed at transforming the eating habits of 18 million people.

This is world’s most ambitious attempt to remake a country’s food culture, and could be a model for how to turn the tide on a global obesity epidemic that researchers say contributes to four million premature deaths a year.

It’s hard to overstate how significant Chile’s actions are — or how hard it has been to get there in the face of the usual pressures,” said Stephen Simpson, director of the Charles Perkins Center, an organization of scholars focused on nutrition and obesity science and policy.

The multi billion dollar food and soda industries have exerted those pressures to successfully stave off regulation in many other countries.

Since the food law was enacted two years ago, it has forced multinational companies like Kellogg to remove iconic cartoon characters from sugary cereal boxes and banned the sale of candy like Kinder Surprise that use trinkets to lure young consumers. The law prohibits the sale of junk food like ice cream, chocolate and potato chips in Chilean schools and proscribes such products from being advertised during television programs or on websites aimed at young audiences.

Do you think this is possible in the United States?

6 Things Americans are Buying Less Of (and it makes me happy)

cerealCan you guess what six things Americans are buying less of that makes me very happy?

  1. Cereal

In one recent four-week period, cereal sales were down 7%, and cereal giant Kellogg’s sales decreased 10%. The reasons for cereal’s declining dominance at the breakfast table are many. As the Wall Street Journal reported, consumers are more apt nowadays to turn to yogurt or fast food in the morning, and they’re less likely to have time to eat breakfast at home at all—not even if it’s a simple bowl of cereal.

Consumers also want their breakfast to pack more punch, protein-wise. “We are competing with quick-serve restaurants more, but the bigger driver is that people want more protein,” Kellogg CEO John Bryant told the Journal.

2. Milk

It’s no coincidence that milk sales have been falling alongside cereal, with cow’s milk struggling especially due to the rise of alternatives like soy and almond milk.

3. Orange Juice

Sales of yet another breakfast-at-home staple, orange juice, have plummeted 40% since the late 1990s.

4. Soda

The crash of soda—diet soda in particular—has been years in the making, with consumers increasingly turning to energy drinks, flavored water, and other beverages instead of the old carbonated caffeine drink of choice. The latest Wall Street report from Coca-Cola showed that the soda giant missed estimates, partly because sales of Diet Coke in North America fell in the “mid-single digits.”

5. Cupcakes

Well, it looks like many of us at least have stopped buying the pricey “gourmet” variety of cupcakes.  Is the gourmet cupcake trend officially dead?

6. Bread

According to one survey, 56% of American shoppers said they are cutting back on white bread. White bread was surpassed in sales by wheat bread sometime around 2006, but in recent years the gluten-free trend has hurt sales of all breads. Sales are even down in European countries like baguette-loving France, where consumption is down 10%. In American restaurants, meanwhile, there’s an epidemic of free bread disappearing from tables, as fewer owners want to bear the expense of putting out free rolls and other breads that no one is going to eat.

What happens when you drink 10 sodas a day?

10cokesadayWhat happens when you drink 10 sodas a day? Inspired by Morgan Spurlock’s “Super Size Me” documentary, in which the filmmaker ate nothing but McDonald’s food for an entire month, George Prior documented what happened when he drank 10 Cokes a day for 30 days.

On his website, 10Cokesaday.com, Prior explains that he wanted to raise awareness about how much sugar people drink every day.
There are 140 calories and 39 grams of sugar in a 12-ounce can of Coke. The World Health Organization recommends a limit of 25 grams of sugar per day.

To lose weight he will follow the Paleo diet and eat only foods eaten by early humans, including meat, fish, vegetables and fruit without dairy, grains and processed food; Paleolithic humans did not eat pizza or drink soda.
Prior started his 30 day soda journey at 168 pounds, with a body fat percentage of 9%. Thirty days and 300 Cokes later, he gained 23 pounds and increased his body fat percentage to 16%.

In a series of videos, Prior, who claims he’s on the Paleo diet, documented how he felt and his weight gain.

“After drinking 10 Cokes all day, then we had friends over for trick-or-treating and I had pizza, I had some beer, went out trick-or-treating with the kids,” said Prior in a video. “I had some candy with the kids when they got back and I laid in bed for a couple hours with my stomach hurting and not feeling very well.”

Source – 10Cokesaday.com