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Top Ten Ways to Incorporate Exercise into your Day

Top Ten Ways to Incorporate Exercise into your Day. Not exercising is worse for your health than smoking, reports a new study. Here are our best tricks for sneaking in more activity during the day without changing your routine.

1. Schedule physical activity into your calendar like you would any other appointment

2. Exercise first thing in the morning so you get it done

3. Park your car farther away from the shopping center. Like most people, you may have a habit of parking as close as possible to the entrance. If you don’t have any physical limitations that make walking difficult, park further away. And if you take public transportation to work, school, or anywhere you’re going, get off one stop further from your stop.

4. Take a “walk break” whenever you can find the time during the day. Taking short 10 minute walks a few times a day will do wonders for your metabolism!

5. Play with your pets! A great activity for everyone.

6. Choose the stairs over the elevator. When you have the option to take the stairs in the subway, at work or at home – take the stairs. Just think of those extra calories you’re burning.

7. Replace your office chair with an exercise ball that makes you move more and stand up to take phone calls. Have your dumbbells handy! Squeeze in bicep curls, tricep extensions and shoulder presses during the call.

8. Buy a jump rope or mini trampoline and have “mini workouts” throughout the day

9. Go for a walk after dinner

10. When vacuuming try to use your arm, back and abdominal muscles to push the vacuum.

I hope these Top Ten Ways to Incorporate Exercise into your Day have been useful. More and more research is showing there is substantial benefit to adding short bouts of exercise during your day—and without even stepping foot in a gym!
Every minute of intentional movement counts. Find satisfaction in knowing that your efforts of using the stairs instead of the elevator and choosing the furthest parking spot from the door are not wasted!

Do You Know About The Healing Power of Pets?

Do you know pets have healing power? Such as

  • Lower blood pressure
  • less risk of heart disease
  • reduced anxiety

The number of scientifically proven health benefits of pet ownership is rising faster than the number of chew toys strewn around your house.

These health pluses aren’t just the result of the extra exercise you get walking your dog or playing hide-and-seek with your cat. The bond that you and your pet develop is also part of the equation.

“Owning a pet gives you a sense of purpose and belonging that can increase feelings of positivity and lower stress levels, all of which translates to health benefits,” says Allen McConnell, PhD, a psychology professor at Miami University who studies human-pet interaction.

Research shows that people who interact with animals experience a boost in levels of oxytocin, the hormone that promotes love and trust and is linked to reduced blood pressure and heart rate. Regularly playing with your pet helps too. “Play, such as challenging your pet to find a hidden toy, helps build the bond between owner and pet and brings you closer,” says Kate Perry, a certified dog trainer and the author of Training for Both Ends of the Leash.

Source – Prevention magazine. Feb 8, 2013

Owning a Pet Can Help Improve Your Overall Health – PART 1

Did you know that owning a pet can help improve your overall health? Our dogs are part of our family. Some might say a little “too much” since they sleep in our bed and cuddle up on the couch with us!  See all the ways pet owners’ health can prosper—physically, mentally, and emotionally.

This series in divided into 3 parts – the physical, mental and emotional benefits of pet ownership.

PART 1 – Physical Benefits of Owning a Pet

  1. Exercising, caring for, and just being around pets can boost your overall physical health, lower your risk of developing certain heart-related issues, and ease your aches and pains.
  2. Pet owners have a better level of fitness. You won’t burn a whole lot of calories watching your pet fish swim around in its bowl. But if you have a dog, you’re likely getting more exercise than those who don’t. Turns out that knowing your pet needs exercise is a powerful motivator to get out and walk. About half of dog owners get at least 30 minutes of exercise per day, five days per week. That’s the recommended amount. And the benefits don’t stop there. Dog walkers also walk more vigorously than when walking alone, and saw a greater improvement in fitness than those who walked with a human companion. People often talk each other out of getting exercise, but we don’t try to make those lame excuses to our pooches.
  3. Pets improve your heart health. Watching a cute kitten play or snuggling a dog can be heartwarming. It can also just be plain good for your heart. Pet owners are more likely to have lower resting heart rates and blood pressure than those who are pet-free. And having a dog can increase your likelihood of survival a year after a heart attack. Cats are particularly good for your circulation and cardiovascular health. Studies show that owning a cat at some point in your life can decrease your odds of dying from a heart attack. Cat owners also tend to have fewer strokes. While they fill your heart with love, pets also help keep your heart strong.
  4. Pet owners can see lower cholesterol and triglycerides levels.  This could be, in part, because pet owners tend to be more active. Pets also have been known to warn their diabetic owners ahead of dangerous drops in blood sugar—about one third of dogs with diabetic owners have shown this ability.
  5. Chronic pain sufferers find some relief when they own pets. Research is unclear as to why pets appear to make it easier to cope with painful conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. Some suspect that caring for a pet helps take your mind off your discomfort and problems. Additionally, when you snuggle up against a warm pet, the heat can soothe pains associated with conditions like fibromyalgia.
  6. Animals help children build up stronger immunity. Research shows that children who grow up in a household with a dog, cat, or on a farm with livestock are less likely to have allergies. Although pets can be one of the common triggers for asthma, researchers say babies that grow up in a house with a cat are actually less likely to develop the condition when they’re older—unless the mother is allergic to cats.

Look for PART 2 in this series about how owning a pet can help your mental health.