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Got Reflux?

This week I have been attending a summit on the link between the gut and the brain. A big message for me was that stomach acid is critical to good brain function.

Yet, so many people are blocking acid production with chronic use of acid blocking drugs.

We need proper stomach acid production to trigger the rest of the digestive process so we get optimal nutrient absorption.

Stomach acid is critical to

  1. break down and emulsify protein molecules.
  2. help trigger intrinsic factor which is a molecule that helps with B12 absorption.
  3. reduce the microbial load by sterilizing the gut.
  4.  help close the esophageal sphincter.
  5.  stimulate the opening of the pyloric sphincter which is the opening at the bottom of the stomach and the small intestine ( get food out of the stomach or else it can just sit in there and ferment and putrefy).

We need enough acid to actually close the sphincter that protects the esophagus from the stomach acid from jumping up. So if we don’t have enough stomach acid, then we’re much more likely to develop acid reflux and GERD.

Definitely talk this over with your physician or health care provider.

Got Heartburn?

According to the National Institute of Health, 20% of Americans suffer from heartburn symptoms at least once per week, and nearly half of these people experience symptoms every day.

The pain associated with heartburn is caused by stomach acid backing up into the esophagus through the valve at the entry point of the stomach. The lining of the esophagus is not able to handle the extreme acidity of stomach acid, and because of this, acid reflux can cause considerable damage and lead to ulceration and even cancer.

According to Jonathan Wright in his book Why Stomach Acid is Good For You by, the best way to avoid heartburn and prevent acid reflux is to support proper function of the lower esophageal sphincter. The following are some practical ways to do this.

  • Drink more water. Dehydration can lead to acid reflux by causing the lower esophageal sphincter to relax.
  • Avoid foods and beverages that can weaken the lower esophageal sphincter. This includes chocolate, coffee, mints, sugar, alcohol and onions.
  • Don’t overeat. Excessively large meals put pressure on the lower esophageal sphincter and encourage it to open when it shouldn’t.
  • Elevate the head of your bed by 4 to 8 inches. This will keep gravity working in your favor and make it less likely for stomach acid to drain into the esophagus.
  • Get tested for food sensitivities and avoid the reactive foods that may be interfering with the function of the lower esophageal sphincter. Consider a trial of eliminating grains and dairy from your diet. These are the two most likely food groups to cause sensitivities.

It’s also helpful to avoid foods and beverages that can irritate the lining of the esophagus. This includes citrus fruits, tomatoes, spicy foods, coffee and carbonated beverages.

For more information on heartburn and acid reflux, I highly recommend that you read Why Stomach Acid is Good For You by Jonathan Wright, MD.

Join my FREE WEBINAR this Thursday April 20th at 6pm Pacific on Healthy Gut, Healthy Body – Unlocking the Power of Your Second Brain.” REGISTER HERE 

5 Digestive Health Tips After Thanksgiving

SICK STOMACHNeed some digestive health tips? For many of us, digestive discomfort has become a fact of life…especially at holiday time. Do you suffer from gas, bloating, upset stomach, constipation or heartburn? By paying attention and making a few simple changes, you can help your digestive system do the job it was made to do – absorbing nutrients and keeping things running smoothly. Learn what you can do today to help take care of your digestive system.

1. Drink half your body weight in ounces of water daily

There’s almost nothing better for your digestive system and your overall health than water. Drinking too little water slows down your digestive system significantly because a harder stool is more difficult to pass. Drink plenty of water and other fluids, especially after you exercise.

2. Move – Physical activity speeds up digestion, increases blood flow to all your organs, and stimulates muscles in the GI tract, helping your organs work more efficiently. It can even tone the walls of your colon! Aim for 30 minutes of exercise every day.

3. Make fiber a regular part of every day, and you will be regular every day. Fiber is the traffic cop that helps keep everything moving smoothly in your intestines. It slows down digestion and absorption so the glucose in food enters your bloodstream more slowly, keeping your blood sugar at a more even level. Additionally, fiber increases the weight and size of your stools, and by softening them, fiber helps them pass quickly through your system. Without fiber, you get the gas, gridlock, and occasional discomfort of constipation

4. Take a Probiotic – Probiotics are live microorganisms (in most cases, bacteria) that are similar to the beneficial microorganisms naturally found in the human gut. These “good bacteria” are used to prevent and alleviate many different conditions but particularly those that affect the gastrointestinal tract. They are particularly good at regulating the amount of healthy bacteria in your system and normalizing bowel movements. Take a probiotic supplement for a minimum of two weeks — try it and see if you notice a difference! CLICK HERE TO ORDER

5. Knock out your Trouble Foods with a Digestive enzyme -The Digestive Enzyme I recommend contains seven different enzymes, which help break down most of the foods we eat, from dairy and protein to fats and carbohydrates and helps alleviate the feeling of over-fullness after a large meal. The artichoke extract provides even more relief for occasional upset stomach or bloating caused by indigestion. CLICK HERE TO TRY IT

BIG NEWS !!!! – On the Monday, November 30 Dr Oz Show, Dr. Mehmet Oz will be speaking to  WBO Welterweight Champion Timothy Bradley about how he uses this digestive supplement to optimize his digestive health.