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Americans Are Saying No to Soda Pop

A study released in 2016 shows Americans are saying no to soda pop!

The study, published in the journal Obesity in 2016 relied on a representative sample of 18,000 children 2 to 19 years old, and 27,652 adults aged 20 and older. They were asked about their beverage consumption over the past 24 hours: juice, milk, sugar and diet soda, coffee and tea, sports drinks, water and alcohol.

The study was published online November 14, 2017 in Obesity. It is the first paper to present the most recent national data on beverage consumption from the Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) which is the gold standard for understanding consumption trends and patterns at a national level.

An analysis of the report reveals that

  1. Per capita consumption of all drinks declined.
  2. Children took in 312.6 drink calories a day in 2014, compared with 473.8 a day in 2003.
  3. Adults took in  341.1 calories in 2014, compared with 425.0 in 2003.
  4. 60.7 percent of children and 50 percent of adults drank a sugary beverage (including soda)  on any given day in 2014, down from 79.7 percent of children and 61.5 percent of adults in 2003.
  5. In every age group, water drinking increased. Sara N. Bleich, a professor of public health policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and lead author of the new study, said that this is probably because soda drinkers are switching to water.
  6. The consumption of 100 percent fruit juice also declined, most sharply among adolescents and those over age 40.

REFERENCE

“Trends in Beverage Consumption among Children and Adults, 2003-2014,” Sara N. Bleich, Kelsey A. Vercammen, Jonathan Wyatt Koma, and Zhonghe Li, Obesity, online November 14, 2017, doi: 10.1002/oby.22056

Weight Loss Secrets You Don’t Hear About

Vector illustration of stop diet concept background

Vector illustration of stop diet concept background

With all the diets available, I have found that getting healthy is the key to losing weight.There are two key weight loss secrets.

  1. Take away the things that make you toxic and inflamed.
  2. Provide your body with foods and activities that help you detoxify and cool inflammation.

Your body has a natural ability to find balance and heal once you stop doing things that throw it off balance and provide things that put it back in balance.

By eliminating the major sources of toxins in your life — addictive habits such as coffee, sugar, alcohol, processed food, fast food, junk food, trans fats, and high-fructose corn syrup — and reducing toxic stress for only 7 days, your body can renew and rejuvenate itself.

By eliminating the major sources of inflammation in your diet — food allergens, sugar and flour products, and bad fats — your body can heal.

Then, by eating whole, detoxifying, anti-inflammatory foods, the power of the program can take full effect.

You have the power to transform your life forever by choosing to work with your body, rather than against it. The same things that make people sick make them fat. In fact, being overweight is actually a symptom of an underlying health problem.

For many people, toxicity in particular may be what’s been frustrating  weight-loss attempts as toxins in our body can disrupt our body’s natural mechanisms for health. Getting healthy is the key to losing weight.

This can frequently explain why people seem to reach a plateau or “hit the wall” when attempting to lose weight, where, after an initial drop in weight, further weight loss proves to be next to impossible. Just restricting calories is a recipe for disaster and inevitably leads to failure. Unless you get rid of this toxic load, you might find yourself continually hitting this wall.

Could Your Healthy Diet Make Me Fat?

Some fibres examples in a every day food

Some fibres examples in a every day food

Could your healthy diet make me fat? An Israeli study at Weizmann Institute of Science in 2015 about personalized nutrition was heralded by a media frenzy. “This diet study upends everything we thought we knew about ‘healthy’ food,” claimed one headline. The study suggested that dieters may be mistakenly eating a lot of some foods, like tomatoes, that are good for most people, but bad for them. And it raised the possibility that an individualized approach to nutrition could eventually supplant national guidelines meant for the entire public.

Personalized medicine has already become well established in clinical practice. We know that the effects of some drugs vary from person to person and that genetic analysis of tumors can help doctors select the best cancer treatment for a particular patient. Despite the recent fanfare, we have also known for a long time that people respond differently to specific foods based on their genes, past health or other factors.

Standard diets typically fail to produce significant long-term weight loss.  For instance, while a clinical trial published in 2005 of 160 adults randomly assigned to the Atkins, Ornish, Weight Watchers and Zone diets reported modest results in all groups after one year, individuals in those groups experienced weight changes ranging from a loss of 35 pounds or more to a gain of 10 or more.

This variation is commonly attributed to behavior. Some people are simply more motivated and compliant with their assigned diet than others. But suppose the people who did poorly on the low-fat Ornish diet would have done well on the low-carbohydrate Atkins diet because of their biological makeup, and vice versa? If we knew that ahead of time, we could assign everyone the diet that’s best suited for him or her.

Despite the hype, personalized nutrition is not ready for practical application in the clinic. But this exciting field of research may help explain why people respond so differently to diet based on biology. In this way, personalized nutrition may build upon, rather than substitute for, national dietary guidelines, providing a common ground for all sides in the “diet war” to declare a truce.