Sleep Duration & Dementia

One in three Americans do not get enough sleep, and 45% of the world’s population doesn’t either.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls that a “public health problem,” because disrupted sleep is associated with a higher risk of conditions including diabetes, stroke and cardiovascular disease.
But what about dementia?
It is well known that people with Alzheimer’s suffer sleep issues. Insomnia, nighttime wandering and daytime sleepiness are common for them.
But could poor sleep earlier in life actually cause dementia?
The journal for the American Academy of Neurology, finds that people who get less REM, or dream-stage sleep, may be at higher risk for developing dementia. REM is the fifth stage of sleep, when the eyes move, the body heats up, breathing and pulse quicken and the mind dreams.

The Number One Way to Boost Your Brain Power

Nothing protects the brain quite like regular exercise. Here is the list of why exercise is the number one way to boost your brain. Exercise is like investing in a retirement fund for your brain.

Exercise can

  1. Increase blood flow to the brain, which of course increase oxygen and nutrients to the brain.
  2. Enhance the release of chemicals known as nerve growth factors that help brain cells function properly. Nerve growth factors probably also help build new brain cells, giving the brain an extra cushion against age-related losses.
  3. helps prevent hypertension and diabetes, which are two major risk factors for dementia.
  4. seems to be especially helpful for female brains. That might make a good workout even more important because women are generally more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease compared with men of the same age. According to the Alzheimer’s Assn., two-thirds of Americans with the disease are women.

About 2.5 hours of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise every week would be a reasonable goal.

5 Ways to Boost Your Brain through Your Gut – PODCAST

A healthy gut is needed for a healthy brain. Your brain’s health is dictated by what goes on in your gut. What’s taking place in your intestines affects not only your brain’s daily functions, but also determines your risk for a number of neurological conditions in the future.

Listen to my recording to hear the 5 things you can do TODAY  to boost your brain through your gut.


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