Posts

Key Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease

Did you know there are key biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease?

Whether a person is at risk of developing the disease versus actively has symptoms, is often reflective of the number of their biomarkers. As few as three to five suboptimal lab values may be observed in an at-risk pre-symptomatic person versus up to 25 in a symptomatic person.

Key Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease.

This information I learned from a great book called The End of Alzheimer’s: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline by Dale E. Bredesen, M.D. He is a professor of neurology at the Easton Laboratories for Neurodegenerative Disease Research at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

His laboratory focuses on identifying and understanding basic mechanisms underlying Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions. He has collaborated on the publication of more than 220 academic research papers.

Dr. Bredesen proposes a pretty radical idea. He says that Alzheimer’s disease as we know it could be largely ended with the current generation. The key to doing this? By treating the prevention of Alzheimer’s in much the same way we treat colon cancer — with screening to detect the first signs of trouble.

A key message from Dr Bredesen is that not only should we potentially get tested for the key biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. Importantly, for some of these tests, our goal should be to keep our ranges even healthier than what the laboratory references may indicate as “normal.”

Key Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease

Here are some key biomarkers that Dr. Bredesen recommends and  tells us the ranges he thinks are more optimal than the standard “within normal limits” ranges:

    hsCRP (less than 1.0 mg/L)

    Fasting insulin (less than 7 mIU/L)

    Hemoglobin A1c (less than 5.5%)

    Homocysteine (less than 7 μmol/L)

Dr Bresden believes “Alzheimer’s disease should essentially decrease to a very low level with the current generation. If everybody gets checked, we recommend that everybody 45 or over get a cognoscopy.”

CLICK HERE for another great blog article related to brain health!

WHAT IS NUTRIGENOMICS? – Podcast


Have you heard about Nutrigenomics? In this episode of Dr Karen Health Talks, I explain how we are not victims of our genes. In fact with the human genome project showing that humans have the same number of genes as worms, there is a whole new understanding of the cause of human variation. I use the specific example of Alzheimer’s Disease and the ApoE4 SNP and how this marker is more likely to be expressed with a diet high in saturated fat and sugar. You may want to  listen to this podcast many times to get an understanding of the future of personalized health and wellness interventions. There will be more episodes on this topic!

The Startling Link Between Sugar and Alzheimer’s

Have you ever considered their might be a connection with the amount of sugar in your diet and your risk of Alzheimer’s Disease?

A high-carb diet, and the resulting high blood sugar, are associated with cognitive decline. In recent years, Alzheimer’s disease has occasionally referred to as “Type 3 Diabetes”, It’s increasingly looking like Alzheimer’s is another potential side effect of a sugary, Western-style diet.
A longitudinal study published Thursday in the journal Diabetologia, followed 5,189 people over 10 years and found that people with high blood sugar had a faster rate of cognitive decline than those with normal blood sugar—whether or not their blood-sugar level technically made them diabetic. In other words, the higher the blood sugar, the faster the cognitive decline.
There are several theories out there to explain the connection between high blood sugar and dementia.Here are some:
  1. Diabetes can weaken blood vessels, which increases the likelihood that you’ll have ministrokes in the brain, causing various forms of dementia.
  2. A high intake of simple sugars can make cells, including those in the brain, insulin resistant, which could cause the brain cells to die.
  3. Obese people releass cytokines, or inflammatory proteins, that can also contribute to cognitive deterioration
CLICK HERE or the full article