Got Tempeh?

Got tempeh?

I was in my favorite Mother’s market today and was so excited get my firm tempeh that I love to saute and use as my plant based protein source.

Want some good plant-based protein sources?

Tempeh is a form of soy that is closer to soy in its whole food form. The vast majority of soy consumed in the U.S. comes from a highly processed form of soy. The soybeans we consume have usually been genetically engineered, cracked, dehulled, crushed, and subjected to solvent extraction to separate their oils from the rest of the bean. What’s left behind after oil extraction (defatted soy flour) is then further processed into animal feed, or processed to produce a protein concentrate or a protein isolate. The isolate can be used as an ingredient in low-fat soymilk, and the concentrate can be further processed (extruded) to form a textured soy protein for use in meat analog products (like soy burgers).

Tempeh is produced with significantly less processing than most low-fat soymilks and soy burgers, and they are soy foods that are much closer to a “whole foods” category than soy protein isolates and concentrates.

Fermentation increases the digestibility of soy (especially its proteins), nutrient absorption from soy  and the concentration of bioactive peptides

Cooked tempeh can be eaten alone, or used in chili, stir fries, soups, salads, sandwiches, and stews. Tempeh’s complex flavor has been described as nutty, meaty, and mushroom-like. It freezes well, and is now commonly available in many western supermarkets, as well as in ethnic markets and health food stores.