Want to Know How to Snack Smart?

Snacking between meals can keep you from getting too hungry and help you maintain a more consistent energy level throughout the day. The secret is eating the right kind of snacks, ones that will give your body the nutrients that it needs.

Nutrient Intake
It can be difficult to get all of your daily recommended nutrients from breakfast, lunch, and dinner alone. Eating small, healthy snacks between your regular meals can add to that nutrient intake.

Snacking on a combination of fruits and a few nuts can be a great and easy way to introduce more vitamins, antioxidants, and healthy fats into your body. Grain crackers and vegetables can give you a fiber-rich boost, and low-fat dairies can provide an increase in calcium.

Feel Fuller, Longer     
If you’re concerned about snacking because you’re trying to manage your weight, smart snacking with fiber- rich foods is one way to actually help you out.

Take almonds, for example. A one-ounce serving of almonds (approximately 23) contains about six grams of protein, four grams of fiber, and is only around 160 calories.

A healthy snack fills you up with the right nutrients and can actually allow you to stick to a moderate amount of food when you do eat your next meal. High-fiber snacks take longer to digest than other snacks, causing you to actually eat less.

Have a Plan
One of the best ways to avoid reaching for unhealthy junk foods is to create weekly meal plans that account for cravings between meals. Put tasty, convenient pairings—like apples or celery with peanut butter—and healthy snacks such as cherry tomatoes, olives, and pickles on your shopping list.

Just make sure to mix up your snacks. While it’s important to incorporate whole, low-glycemic foods into your diet, it’s easy to fall into a snacking rut and just go for the same old, same old. And boredom can lead to the sugary, empty-caloric dark side.

Plan your snacks and save yourself any post-eating guilt.

Consider These Snack Options:
These delicious and quick snacks are under 300 calories:

4 Tbsp. hummus + 1 large carrot = 170 calories
1 medium apple + 2 oz. cheese = 235 calories
1 oz. almonds (approximately 23) + ¼ c. dried cranberries = 255 calories
1 slice whole-grain bread + ½ an avocado = 260 calories
1 cup Greek yogurt + ½ c. granola = 290 calories
2 Tbsp. peanut butter + 1 banana = 295 calories

What You Eat May Be Killing Your Brain – PART 1

Backdrop composed of human head and symbolic elements and suitable for use in the projects on human mind, consciousness, imagination, science and creativity

Just in case you need another reason to cut back on sugar, it now turns out that Alzheimer’s could well be a form of diet-induced diabetes.

What Is Alzheimer’s?

A neuropathologist named Alois Alzheimer noticed, over a century ago, that a certain protein was taking the place of normal brain cells. How those proteins (beta amyloid plaques as they’re called) get there has been a mystery. What’s becoming clear, however, is that a lack of insulin — or insulin resistance — not only impairs brain function but seems to be implicated in the formation of those plaques.

The Diabetes/Dementia Link

We know that people with diabetes are at least twice as likely to get Alzheimer’s, and that obesity alone increases the risk of impaired brain function.

What’s new is the thought that while diabetes doesn’t “cause” Alzheimer’s, they have the same root: an over consumption of those “foods” that spike insulin. (Genetics have an effect on susceptibility, as they appear to with all environmental diseases.)

If the rate of Alzheimer’s rises in lockstep with Type 2 diabetes, which has nearly tripled in the United States in the last 40 years, we will shortly see a devastatingly high percentage of our population with not only failing bodies but also brains.

The link between diet and dementia negates our notion of Alzheimer’s as a condition that befalls us by chance. Adopting a sane diet, a diet contrary to the standard American diet (called SAD), would appear to give us a far better shot at avoiding diabetes in all of its forms, along with its dreaded complications.

CLICK HERE for PART 2 explaining how Alzheimer’s is considered Type 3 Diabetes.

Could Your Healthy Diet Make Me Fat?

Some fibres examples in a every day food

Some fibres examples in a every day food

Could your healthy diet make me fat? An Israeli study at Weizmann Institute of Science in 2015 about personalized nutrition was heralded by a media frenzy. “This diet study upends everything we thought we knew about ‘healthy’ food,” claimed one headline. The study suggested that dieters may be mistakenly eating a lot of some foods, like tomatoes, that are good for most people, but bad for them. And it raised the possibility that an individualized approach to nutrition could eventually supplant national guidelines meant for the entire public.

Personalized medicine has already become well established in clinical practice. We know that the effects of some drugs vary from person to person and that genetic analysis of tumors can help doctors select the best cancer treatment for a particular patient. Despite the recent fanfare, we have also known for a long time that people respond differently to specific foods based on their genes, past health or other factors.

Standard diets typically fail to produce significant long-term weight loss.  For instance, while a clinical trial published in 2005 of 160 adults randomly assigned to the Atkins, Ornish, Weight Watchers and Zone diets reported modest results in all groups after one year, individuals in those groups experienced weight changes ranging from a loss of 35 pounds or more to a gain of 10 or more.

This variation is commonly attributed to behavior. Some people are simply more motivated and compliant with their assigned diet than others. But suppose the people who did poorly on the low-fat Ornish diet would have done well on the low-carbohydrate Atkins diet because of their biological makeup, and vice versa? If we knew that ahead of time, we could assign everyone the diet that’s best suited for him or her.

Despite the hype, personalized nutrition is not ready for practical application in the clinic. But this exciting field of research may help explain why people respond so differently to diet based on biology. In this way, personalized nutrition may build upon, rather than substitute for, national dietary guidelines, providing a common ground for all sides in the “diet war” to declare a truce.