How Many Cells are in the Human Body?

Human blood circulationI was asked today how many cells are in the human body. Good question. I thought I would blog about what I found out.

Our cells can’t fill out census forms, so they can’t tell you themselves. And while it’s easy enough to look through a microscope and count off certain types of cells, this method isn’t practical either. Some types of cells are easy to spot, while others weave themselves up into obscurity. Even if you could count ten cells each second, it would take you tens of thousands of years to finish counting. Plus, there would be certain logistical problems you’d encounter along the way to counting all the cells in your body–for example, chopping your own body up into tiny patches for microscopic viewing.

For now, the best we can hope for is a study published  in Annals of Human Biology, entitled, “An Estimation of the Number of Cells in the Human Body.”

The authors–a team of scientists from Italy, Greece, and Spain–admit that they’re hardly the first people to tackle this question. They looked back over scientific journals and books from the past couple centuries and found many estimates. But those estimates sprawled over a huge range, from 5 billion to 200 million trillion cells. And practically none of scientists who offered those numbers provided an explanation for how they came up with them. Clearly, this is a subject ripe for research.
If scientists can’t count all the cells in a human body, how can they estimate it? The mean weight of a cell is 1 nanogram. For an adult man weighing 70 kilograms, simple arithmetic would lead us to conclude that that man has 70 trillion cells.

How I Make Money with Purpose

SANOVIV 6It is my own personal growth journey to share with you how I make money with purpose. It is personal growth because I have a reluctance to talk about money and also to share my business model . The business model happens to be called Conscious Network Marketing. Oops….I said it. It was hard, but I said it.

I can honestly say that many people’s current perception(and my previous perception) of Network Marketing is outdated and misinformed. It is simply a win/win marketing model that uses genuine communication, authentic listening, and the core desire to improve peoples’ lives to build a thriving business and team members who feel inspired, empowered, and connected. I absolutely LOVE it!

Team Northrup was my vehicle to adjust my entire perception of the Network Marketing industry. The core values of the community called Team Northrup are Community, Authenticity, Service, Support, Gratitude, Passion, Purpose, Abundance, and Connection.

Let’s face it, the network marketing industry gets a bad rap from time to time. Team Northrup’s wellness entrepreneurs are deeply committed to changing how this industry is seen and practiced. We’ve experienced first-hand how positively our work can impact peoples’ lives.

If you would like to connect with me and learn more about how this business model can support you and your goals, CLICK HERE.

Do you Steer Clear of Cereals?

CHildrens CerealDo you steer clear of cereals? I recommend you do! It’s not just kids’ cereals that are too sweet. Adult cereals like Kashi GoLean Crunch have 3 teaspoons of added sugars per (3/4 cup) serving.

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) analysis of more than 1,500 cereals, including more than 180 children’s cereals, shows that a child who eats a bowl a day for a year ends up consuming 10 pounds of sugar.

The cereals loaded with the most added sugar frequently come in packaging that features cartoon characters to appeal to kids. A single serving can contain nearly as much sugar as three Chips Ahoy! cookies, and more than two Keebler Fudge Stripe cookies. And because the serving sizes listed on many cereal boxes are unrealistically small, even sugar-conscious consumers are eating even more than they realize. To top it all off, 11 of the 13 most heavily sugared children’s cereals feature marketing claims like “Good Source of Fiber” that suggest misleadingly that the products are healthful.

So how do you navigate the cereal aisle to find the least sugary products? Check EWG’s lists to see which have the most and the least sugar before you head to the store.

EWG also found evidence that promotional labeling on cereal boxes is designed to distract consumers from focusing on the unhealthy sugar content by making claims that the product provides important nutrients, such as “Excellent Source of Vitamin D” or “Good Source of Fiber.” The labels on seven of the 10 most heavily sugared children’s cereals in EWG’s 2011 cereal report currently feature a marketing claim promoting their nutrient content.

The Food and Drug Administration has not yet set a limit on the amount of added sugars allowed in products that make nutritional claims, nor does the agency include a percent Daily Value for sugar on the Nutrition Facts panel required on food products to help inform consumers how much sugar is too much.

ABOUT The Environmental Working Group (www.ewg.org)

The Environmental Working Group is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment.  Our mission is to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. EWG drives consumer choice and civic action with its game-changing investigations and research on toxics and environmental health, food and agriculture, and water and energy.