Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria? Glyphosate is a chemical that is very useful to farmers because they can spray it all over their fields. The chemical kills weeds, but leaves the resistant crops untouched.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?

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New evidence suggests that even tiny amounts of the herbicide might be harmful to your friendly bacteria. Some scientists say that leftover herbicide and pesticide on leafy green plants or fruits like apples and pears can end up in the stomach and intestines. There, it makes it harder for bacteria cells to multiply. Since individual bacteria cells don’t live very long, this can end up wiping out entire species.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?

RoundUp has Glyphosate as its active ingredient. Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria? Scientists believe that it is killing bacteria that help people digest gluten, and that is leading to a huge increase in the number of people around the world who suffer from Celiac Disease. It’s that, over the next few decades, scientists will discover more and more diseases that could be connected to RoundUp.

Tips for Protecting Yourself

Peel or wash any fresh produce thoroughly.

Buy organic fruits and vegetables whenever possible. Organic produce is grown without the use of any harmful chemicals, so choosing organics will protect your friendly bacteria.

Choose GMO-free foods whenever possible. As a general rule, if a food doesn’t explicitly market itself as non-GMO or GMO-free, it probably contains at least some genetically modified ingredients.

Avoid packaged and processed foods. These packaged foods are very likely to be made with one or more genetically modified crops. There’s no way to know.

Genetically modified foods, especially those that have been grown with the help of chemicals like RoundUp, pose a serious threat to the microbiome. It’s impossible to know what consequences these types of products might lead to, but the safest course of action is avoid potentially harmful foods whenever you can.

To protect your major organ of detoxification (your liver) you might want to consider supporting your liver. CLICK HERE to learn how.

It’s Been a Rough Year for Sugar

It’s been a rough year for sugar. In my previous blog HERE, I wrote about  the article published in health journal Obesity that  found sugary beverage consumption down 20% in children and 10% in adults from 2003. Fruit juice and sodas took major hits, replaced at the popular table by coconut water and seltzers. Coconut water consumption increased 228% worldwide from 2011 to 2016. Seltzer sales grew from $2.6 billion in 2011 to a projected $8.5 billion last year, led by La Croix, the staple of the suburban Midwest turned cult beverage

Here are some other “BAD” news stories about sugar

  1. PepsiCo announced they would buy home seltzer maker SodaStream  (“a good hedge” said Mad Money’s Jim Cramer!),
  2. Coca-Cola announced they would acquire the 4,000-store Costa Coffee chain
  3. Starbucks announced they’re beginning to test a lower sugar Frappuccino  because even  tweens have started to question the logic behind consuming 67 grams of sugar in one sitting.

When three of the biggest drink manufacturers in the world each make a move  away from the sugary thing that originally made them giant drink manufacturers, we’re reaching a tipping point.

 

Americans Are Saying No to Soda Pop

A study released in 2016 shows Americans are saying no to soda pop!

The study, published in the journal Obesity in 2016 relied on a representative sample of 18,000 children 2 to 19 years old, and 27,652 adults aged 20 and older. They were asked about their beverage consumption over the past 24 hours: juice, milk, sugar and diet soda, coffee and tea, sports drinks, water and alcohol.

The study was published online November 14, 2017 in Obesity. It is the first paper to present the most recent national data on beverage consumption from the Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) which is the gold standard for understanding consumption trends and patterns at a national level.

An analysis of the report reveals that

  1. Per capita consumption of all drinks declined.
  2. Children took in 312.6 drink calories a day in 2014, compared with 473.8 a day in 2003.
  3. Adults took in  341.1 calories in 2014, compared with 425.0 in 2003.
  4. 60.7 percent of children and 50 percent of adults drank a sugary beverage (including soda)  on any given day in 2014, down from 79.7 percent of children and 61.5 percent of adults in 2003.
  5. In every age group, water drinking increased. Sara N. Bleich, a professor of public health policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and lead author of the new study, said that this is probably because soda drinkers are switching to water.
  6. The consumption of 100 percent fruit juice also declined, most sharply among adolescents and those over age 40.

REFERENCE

“Trends in Beverage Consumption among Children and Adults, 2003-2014,” Sara N. Bleich, Kelsey A. Vercammen, Jonathan Wyatt Koma, and Zhonghe Li, Obesity, online November 14, 2017, doi: 10.1002/oby.22056