The Eco-Impact of Meatless Mondays

I was in Mothers market this week and I found a RAW HUMMUS WRAP that has this on the container

“Adopting a plant-based diet is the single most powerful action an individual can take to stop climate change, end world hunger and save our planet”

This got my attention. So I did my research.

I found that adopting “Meatless Mondays”, we can make a serious impact on our carbon footprint by eating fewer animal foods, according to several studies. Italian researchers performed a life-cycle assessment to evaluate the cradle-to-grave environmental impact of several dietary patterns (European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2006.) They discovered that an organic vegan diet had the smallest environmental impact, while a conventionally farmed diet that included meat had the greatest impact on the environment. The more meat is consumed, the greater the eco-impact. Here are a few reasons:

  1. large amounts of chemical pesticides and fertilizers are used  to produce animal feed
  2. large volumes of water and fuel are needed to take animals to market.
  3. Byproducts of animal food production include high greenhouse gas emissions, toxic manure lagoons, deforestation and pollution of groundwater, rivers, streams and oceans.

Beef  has the single greatest impact on the environment. In essence, animals make inefficient “food production machines” because they use large amounts of feed, water and fossil fuels to turn plants into protein, said the scientists. Producing one calorie from beef requires forty calories of fossil fuels, whereas producing one calorie from grains requires only 2.2 calories of fuel. Thus, plant-based diets can play an important role in preserving environmental resources and in reducing hunger in poor nations.

The EWG found that eating less meat can significantly reduce one’s carbon footprint. If a person ate one less burger per week for one year, it would be the equivalent of driving 320 miles less. And if a four-person family took steak off the menu one day per week for one year, it would be like taking their car off the road for almost three months. If everyone in the U.S. ate no meat or cheese for just one day a week, it would be like taking 7.6 million cars off the road.

Thank the “Meatless Monday” program for fueling the idea that everyone – not just vegetarians – should eat less meat and more plants. Its message is sweet and simple: People and the planet can benefit by eating less meat – so just shun it one day a week. Countless organizations, restaurants, schools and hospitals have jumped onto the bandwagon to celebrate this simple concept.

Is Plant- Based Eating Going Mainstream?

I have been following a plant-based eating plan for about 2 months now, For the last 4 days I deepened the journey and am doing a 30 Day Raw Food Challenge. It is something I have always wanted to do but I knew I needed support. Well, the support arrived in the form a a group starting The True Health Lifestyle Program, and so I jumped on board. CLICK HERE to learn about the program I am following.

It seems it is more popular than I realized. At several Kaiser Permanente Medical Centers in California, doctors, nurses, and other staff are learning about plant-powered eating so they can pass along the information to their patients. Some of the medical staff are even adopting plant-powered diets long-term.

Kaiser is the largest healthcare organization in the U.S., and it is focusing on plant-powered eating.

In 2013 Kaiser Permanente published a nutritional update for physicians, which advised doctors to recommend plant-based diets, “to all their patients, especially those with high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or obesity.”

They list the health benefits of a plant-based diet as:

  • Lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar.
  • Reversal or prevention of heart disease and diabetes.
  • Longer life.
  • Healthier weight.
  • Lower risk of developing cancer and diabetes.
  • May slow the progression of certain types of cancer.
  • Improved symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Fewer medications.
  • Lower food costs.

They add that plant-based diets are also good for the environment. Plus, plant-based eating can be a tasty, affordable, and enjoyable way to eat.

What kind of plant-based diet is Kaiser talking about? On Facebook, they say  a plant-based diet, “emphasizes plant foods in their whole, unprocessed form, such as vegetables, fruits, beans, lentils, nuts, whole grains, and small amounts of healthy fats.”

Follow my blog for more about this Plant-Based Eating revolution and why it is happening

Can I Really Do 30 Days of RAW?

If you have followed me on social media you probably know I have been doing a 30 Day Plant-Based Eating Plan. It was hard at first, but now I feel I prefer to eat this way. Isn’t it interesting how we become conditioned by our eating habits?  I would have considered myself to be an absolute meat eater (my father had a family butcher business and we had the BEST meat growing up).

Going plant-based, I have eliminated

  • products with the use of synthetic pesticides, chemical fertilizers, industrial solvents or chemical food additives
  • packaged and processed foods
  • breads
  • bottled condiments
  • cereals
  • crackers
  • cheese
  • refined oils
  • processed meats
  • all animal products including seafood, dairy , and eggs.

So starting September 4 I am going to do #30Days RAW. Yes this is going to be a challenge but I have HUGE support with recipes and shopping lists and video tutorials. CLICK HERE if you wold like this program and jump in with me. There is a 25% discount until September 1st of you use COUPON CODE rawsome2017

Raw has something for everybody, whether you want to improve your health and longevity, cope with food sensitivities, or simply eat fresher, cleaner, and better!

Here is my mantra for the 30 DAYS

“it’s about feeding your whole body and fueling your life!”

My Goal is to have before Sept 4 start

  1. Basic preparation techniques
  2. Easy-to-find ingredients
  3. Kitchen Tools needed
  4. Shopping list for each recipe
  5. Delicious, simple recipes step by step
  6. breakfasts, lunches and dinner recipes
  7. Soups and Snack recipes
  8. Sides and salads
  9. Starters
  10. Raw desserts
  11. Support Group

These are just a few of the many positive things to expect:
• Improved digestion • Clearer skin • More energy • Decreased water retention • Better mood • Less inflammation • Fewer aches and pains • Calmer mind • Improved athletic performance • Enhanced mental focus and clarity • Increased vitality and sense of well being

Look at some of the recipes we will be trying

  • Almond tacos (photo to right)
  • Maple-Dijon Brussels Sprouts
  • Thai Veggie Noodles
  • Root Vegetable Slaw
  • Cherry-Hemp Muesli
  • Strawberry Spinach Salad with Sweet Balsamic Vinaigrette
  • Colorful Cabbage Salad
  • Cauliflower Couscous
  • Carrot-Ginger Coconut Soup
  • Orange-Cranberry-Apple Relish

Seven Benefits of RAW Food

  1. Cooked foods are usually harder to digest than raw foods
  2. Cooking nutrient-dense foods tends to destabilize some of their valuable enzymes and destroy certain antioxidants and vitamins.
  3. Raw foods also help alkalize the body and have less of a chance of fermenting in the gut and causing inflammation/autoimmune reactions.
  4. Many experts feel that foods heated over about 112 degrees Fahrenheit retain less vital enzymes
  5. Raw foods also supply enzymes (called exogenous enzymes). The greater our intake of exogenous enzymes, the easier time we have fully digesting nutrients without overly taxing our systems.
  6. They easily make their way through our digestive systems. The longer a food sits in our digestive tracts, the likelier it is to ferment and cause problems
  7. Likely to feel full when eating lots of raw foods from consuming plenty of fiber and nutrients, so this can help you curb cravings and eat less overall

So if you are game to join me to fuel your life CLICK HERE and remember to enter coupon code rawsome2017