Sugar Linked To $1 Trillion In U.S. Healthcare Spending

Sugar addiction concept as a human head made of white granulated refined sweet cubes as a health care symbol for being addicted to sweeteners and the medical issues pertaining to processed food.

An article in Forbes magazine in 2013 highlighted the Credit Suisse report on sugar which is worth highlighting.

30% – 40% of healthcare expenditures in the USA go to help address issues that are closely tied to the excess consumption of sugar.” Credit Suisse Report

Assuming a U.S. National Healthcare Expenditure of $3 trillion per year – and further assuming we simply take 33% (the lower end of the Credit Suisse range), the calculation is easy. Basically, the U.S. healthcare system spends about $1 trillion per year (and possibly more) fighting the effects of excess sugar consumption.

The health effects around that excessive consumption of sugar include coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Other known risks – mostly around being overweight and/or obese – include osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, gout, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer. A broader summary list of findings in the 40 page report include these:

The 2012 Global Burden of Disease report highlighted obesity as a more significant health crisis globally than hunger and/or malnourishment.

More than half a billion adults (over age 20) worldwide are obese.

The world average daily intake of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is now 70 grams (17 teaspoons).

A scientific statement issued by the American heart Association in 2009 recommends that women take no more than six teaspoons of added sugar a day and men no more than nine.

A single, 12 ounce can of regular soda has about 8 teaspoons of sugar.

While the toxic health effects of sugar are generally well known, there is mounting evidence to suggest that sugar has addictive properties as well.

“Sugar may not pose the clear addictive characteristics of illicit drugs such as cocaine and heroin, but to us it does meet the criteria for being a potentially addictive substance.” Credit Suisse

SOURCE : FORBES 

The Number One Way to Boost Your Brain Power

Nothing protects the brain quite like regular exercise. Here is the list of why exercise is the number one way to boost your brain. Exercise is like investing in a retirement fund for your brain.

Exercise can

  1. Increase blood flow to the brain, which of course increase oxygen and nutrients to the brain.
  2. Enhance the release of chemicals known as nerve growth factors that help brain cells function properly. Nerve growth factors probably also help build new brain cells, giving the brain an extra cushion against age-related losses.
  3. helps prevent hypertension and diabetes, which are two major risk factors for dementia.
  4. seems to be especially helpful for female brains. That might make a good workout even more important because women are generally more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease compared with men of the same age. According to the Alzheimer’s Assn., two-thirds of Americans with the disease are women.

About 2.5 hours of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise every week would be a reasonable goal.

Do You Have a Glucose Meter?

I recommend everyone purchase their own glucose meter as part of their “wellness tracking”.

Digital health and personalized wellness is so popular now and more people are  interested in managing their own health by changing lifestyles and healthier living.

This is your “Fitbit for blood sugar”.

Since the research is showing how blood sugar levels between 105 and 120 can have inflammatory effects on the body, I recommend you know your numbers! Test your blood sugar fasting as well as directly after a meal and 2 hours after. Experiment with different foods.

I checked at Costco today about the price. The actual glucometer is about $12 and the lancets and test strips are the expensive part. I have attached a photo of mine here.

Test strips are far and away the most expensive aspect of using a blood glucose meter. Prices on test strips can range anywhere from $8 to $50 or more per box of 50. Some manufacturers with more expensive strips offer co-pay assistance programs to help drive the cost of test strips down into this range.

If your glucometer is simple to use, you’re more likely to test as often as you should. For most users that means a bright, easy to read screen, buttons that are easy to handle, forgiving test strips and a reasonably small blood sample.

We now know that even in healthy people, high blood sugar after meals can, over time, damage the body, even if it never causes diabetes. In short, it’s no longer just certain people who need to worry about their blood sugar; it’s pretty much everyone. It should concern you even if you’re thin and healthy, and especially if you don’t get much exercise

CLICK HERE to learn about my Sugar Buster Program.