SIX WAYS SLEEP DEPRIVATION CAN LEAD TO WEIGHT GAIN

Most people know they should cut calories and exercise more to trim down, but there’s now significant scientific evidence that another critical component to maintaining your natural normal weight  is avoiding sleep deprivation, sleep scientists say.

“There is no doubt that insufficient sleep promotes hunger and appetite, which can cause excessive food intake resulting in weight gain,” says Eve Van Cauter, director of the Sleep, Metabolism and Health . She has spent 15 years studying the topic.

Here are six specific ways sleep deprivation is linked to weight gain.

  1. When you are running on low energy, you automatically go for a bag of potato chips or other comfort foods.
  2. Ghrelin is the hormone that tells you when to eat, and when you are sleep-deprived, you have more ghrelin.
  3. Leptin is the hormone that tells you to stop eating, and when you are sleep deprived, you have less leptin.
  4. The more sleep-deprived you are, the higher your levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which increases your appetite.
  5. When you’re sleep deprived, the mitochondria in your cells that digest fuel start to shut down.
  6. Your body goes into survival mode. Sleeplessness can fool your body into thinking you’re in danger. Your metabolism slows because your body is trying to maintain its resources, and it also wants more fuel.

The Scariest Part of Halloween is the Sugar

The Scariest Part of Halloween is the sugar. The amount of candy consumed on Halloween may seem downright spooky, especially if you’re a dentist, nutritionist or health-conscious parent. Almost every child in the USA will have candy on Halloween, and about half of the adults will eat some. That compares to 24% of all adults and kids who have candy on a typical day.

The small snack sizes might seem harmless, but they are loaded with sugar! Take a look at the numbers below!

  • Almond Joy, Snack Size – 80 calories, 8 g sugar
  • Butterfinger, Fun Size – 100 calories, 10 g sugar
  • Gummie Bears (Haribo) – 8 pieces, around 65 calories, 21 g sugar, and make sure to brush teeth well after gummy bears.
  • Heath Bar, Snack Size – 76 calories, and 9 g sugar
  • Hershey Kisses – Average 25 calories and 2 – 3 g sugar each kiss
  • Hershey’s Miniature Bars – Average  42 calories and 4 g sugar each bar
  • Jolly Rancher – For the kids who like candy with pucker power, a serving of three Jolly Ranchers is only 70 calories, 0 g of fat and 11 g of sugar.
  • Kit Kat, Fun size – 60 calories and 6 g sugar
  • Peanut M & Ms – Speaking of chocolate morsels, a fun size pouch comes in at 93 calories, but the kiddos are getting some protein here. The serving has 5 g of fat and 9 g of sugar.
  • Pop Rocks vs. Almond Joy – A package of Pop Rocks has just 25 calories compared to 80 calories for a mini-Almond Joy or Mounds.
  • Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup, Snack Size – 110 calories, 11 g sugar per peanut butter cup
  • Skittles, Fun Size – 60 calories, 11 g sugar
  • Smarties – 1 roll, 25 calories, 6 g sugar
  • Snickers, Fun Size – 80 calories, 4 g of fat and 8 g of sugar
  • Sour Patch Kids, Mini Bag – 50 calories, 10 g sugar
  • Starburst, Fun Size – 2 candies, 40 calories, 6 g sugar
  • Three Musketeers Minis – The fun size bar has less calories and fat than many other chocolate bars, just 64 calories, 2 g of fat and 11 g of sugar.
  • Tootsie Pops & Charms Blow Pops – The treat has lasting value—if you don’t bite into it, that is. The pops have 60 calories, 0 g of fat, but 10 – 13 g of sugar.
  • Tootsie Roll Midgee – This chocolaty treat comes in at 23 calories. At 3 g of fat and 20 g of sugar, six Tootsie Roll Midgees have a few less calories than 8 Starbursts.
  • Twix Minis –1 bar, 50 calories, 5 g sugar
  • Twizzlers (Strawberry Twists) – 2 pieces, 50 calories and 6 g sugar

Source – UCSF Childrens Hospital of Oakland

Got Tempeh?

Got tempeh?

I was in my favorite Mother’s market today and was so excited get my firm tempeh that I love to saute and use as my plant based protein source.

Want some good plant-based protein sources?

Tempeh is a form of soy that is closer to soy in its whole food form. The vast majority of soy consumed in the U.S. comes from a highly processed form of soy. The soybeans we consume have usually been genetically engineered, cracked, dehulled, crushed, and subjected to solvent extraction to separate their oils from the rest of the bean. What’s left behind after oil extraction (defatted soy flour) is then further processed into animal feed, or processed to produce a protein concentrate or a protein isolate. The isolate can be used as an ingredient in low-fat soymilk, and the concentrate can be further processed (extruded) to form a textured soy protein for use in meat analog products (like soy burgers).

Tempeh is produced with significantly less processing than most low-fat soymilks and soy burgers, and they are soy foods that are much closer to a “whole foods” category than soy protein isolates and concentrates.

Fermentation increases the digestibility of soy (especially its proteins), nutrient absorption from soy  and the concentration of bioactive peptides

Cooked tempeh can be eaten alone, or used in chili, stir fries, soups, salads, sandwiches, and stews. Tempeh’s complex flavor has been described as nutty, meaty, and mushroom-like. It freezes well, and is now commonly available in many western supermarkets, as well as in ethnic markets and health food stores.