Do You Have a Glucose Meter?

I recommend everyone purchase their own glucose meter as part of their “wellness tracking”.

Digital health and personalized wellness is so popular now and more people are  interested in managing their own health by changing lifestyles and healthier living.

This is your “Fitbit for blood sugar”.

Since the research is showing how blood sugar levels between 105 and 120 can have inflammatory effects on the body, I recommend you know your numbers! Test your blood sugar fasting as well as directly after a meal and 2 hours after. Experiment with different foods.

I checked at Costco today about the price. The actual glucometer is about $12 and the lancets and test strips are the expensive part. I have attached a photo of mine here.

Test strips are far and away the most expensive aspect of using a blood glucose meter. Prices on test strips can range anywhere from $8 to $50 or more per box of 50. Some manufacturers with more expensive strips offer co-pay assistance programs to help drive the cost of test strips down into this range.

If your glucometer is simple to use, you’re more likely to test as often as you should. For most users that means a bright, easy to read screen, buttons that are easy to handle, forgiving test strips and a reasonably small blood sample.

We now know that even in healthy people, high blood sugar after meals can, over time, damage the body, even if it never causes diabetes. In short, it’s no longer just certain people who need to worry about their blood sugar; it’s pretty much everyone. It should concern you even if you’re thin and healthy, and especially if you don’t get much exercise

CLICK HERE to learn about my Sugar Buster Program.

Top Ten Ways to Incorporate Physical Activity into your Day

Daily physical activity is as important as getting quality sleep. So many people use the excuse that they don’t have “time”. I schedule physical activity into my day just like any “appointment”.

Dr Karen’s Top Ten Ways to Incorporate Exercise into your Day

  1. Schedule physical activity into your calendar like you would any other appointment.
  2. Exercise first thing in the morning so you get it done.
  3. Park your car farther away from the shopping center.
  4. Take a “walk break” whenever you can find the time during the day.
  5. Taking short 10 minute walks a few times a day will do wonders for your metabolism AND consider a stand up desk
  6. Play with your pets! A great activity for everyone.
  7. Choose the stairs over the elevator.
  8. Replace your office chair with an exercise ball that makes you move more. Buy a jump rope or mini trampoline and have “mini workouts” throughout the day.
  9. Go for a walk after dinner.
  10. When vacuuming try to use your arm, back and abdominal muscles to push the vacuum.

Melatonin and Migraines

Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone. In humans, melatonin is produced in several tissues, including the brain (pineal gland), retina, and GI tract. In the brain, melatonin synthesis is stimulated by darkness. Once synthesized, it enters the blood stream and acts as an endocrine hormone involved in sleep regulation and a number of other cyclical physiological functions. Daily biological rhythms thought to be influenced by melatonin include activity and sleep, core body temperature, immune function, antioxidant defenses, blood pressure, feeding, and glucose regulation.

Please note that melatonin supplements are not sleeping pills. Oral melatonin supplements support the human body’s natural circadian rhythms and promote healthy sleep. When taken an hour before bedtime, melatonin supports the natural rise in melatonin that typically occurs before sleep.

The role of melatonin is not limited only to sleep. No single therapy works for everybody, but here is some very recent research to consider if you suffer from migraine headaches.

A recently published clinical trial shows that taking melatonin (3 mg) at bedtime for 12 weeks is as effective for migraine prevention as a commonly used medication called amitriptyline (25 mg). The trial compared the use of melatonin, amitriptyline and placebo once daily in people with 2-8 migraine attacks monthly. Melatonin reduced headache days by 2.7 compared to 2.2 days for those receiving amitriptyline. In addition, melatonin cut migraine frequency in half for more patients than those taking amitriptyline. Melatonin was as well tolerated as placebo and resulted in fewer side effects than amitriptyline.

Study conclusion:

“Melatonin 3 mg is effective and better than placebo for migraine prevention. Melatonin is as effective as amitriptyline 25 mg in the primary end point, but better than amitriptyline in the secondary end point (50% responder rate, patients with a higher than 50% improvement in headache frequency). It is more tolerable than amitriptyline 25 mg.”

SOURCE  USANA ask the scientists – health and science education

Full paper:

http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/early/2016/05/10/jnnp-2016-313458.full