Sitting May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise

Sitting May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise

Sitting may sabotage the benefits of exercise. As I write this, I am wanting to stand up! Sitting for most of the day could make us resistant to the usual benefits of exercise, according to a small but worrying new study.

The study is titled “Inactivity induces resistance to the metabolic benefits following acute exercise” and published in The Journal of Applied Physiology in April 2019.

People who spend most of their waking hours sitting face heightened risks for many chronic diseases. They often also experience metabolic problems that raise the risk of diabetes and heart disease, including insulin resistance, poor blood sugar control and high levels of triglycerides, the fatty acids from food that linger in the blood if they are not metabolized.

The researchers asked the volunteers to stop moving around so much and instead confine themselves to fewer than 4,000 steps a day and at least 13 hours of remaining still.

The volunteers complied, sitting, almost uninterrupted, for four days in a row.

They also changed their diets slightly, consuming fewer calories, so that they would not gain weight, which might have changed their metabolisms, separately from the sitting.

Sitting May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise

These results suggest that being sedentary for long periods of time may create conditions inside our bodies “that make us resistant to the usual metabolic improvements after acute exercise,” says Edward Coyle, a professor of kinesiology at UT-Austin and senior author of the new study.

Sitting May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise

Is sitting unhealthy for us primarily because we are not exercising when
we are sitting? Or does sitting have its own unique effects on our
bodies and, if so, could those outcomes somehow alter or even overpower
the positive contributions of exercise?

The Conclusion

He and his colleagues hope to explore some of those issues in future studies. But even now, he says, the data indicate that “it is a very good idea not to sit all day.”

SOURCE
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2019 Apr 1;126(4):1088-1094. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00968.2018. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria? Glyphosate is a chemical that is very useful to farmers because they can spray it all over their fields. The chemical kills weeds, but leaves the resistant crops untouched.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?
?

New evidence suggests that even tiny amounts of the herbicide might be harmful to your friendly bacteria. Some scientists say that leftover herbicide and pesticide on leafy green plants or fruits like apples and pears can end up in the stomach and intestines. There, it makes it harder for bacteria cells to multiply. Since individual bacteria cells don’t live very long, this can end up wiping out entire species.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?

RoundUp has Glyphosate as its active ingredient. Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria? Scientists believe that it is killing bacteria that help people digest gluten, and that is leading to a huge increase in the number of people around the world who suffer from Celiac Disease. It’s that, over the next few decades, scientists will discover more and more diseases that could be connected to RoundUp.

Tips for Protecting Yourself

Peel or wash any fresh produce thoroughly. I soak all fruits (The ones without a hard skin) in water and add some Apple Cider Vinegar (1 teaspoon or less). This helps remove a lot of the pesticides. Rinse well with filtered water and you can’t taste the vinegar at all.

Buy organic fruits and vegetables whenever possible. Organic produce is grown without the use of any harmful chemicals, so choosing organics will protect your friendly bacteria.

Choose GMO-free foods whenever possible. As a general rule, if a food doesn’t explicitly market itself as non-GMO or GMO-free, it probably contains at least some genetically modified ingredients.

Avoid packaged and processed foods. These packaged foods are very likely to be made with one or more genetically modified crops. There’s no way to know.

Genetically modified foods, especially those that have been grown with the help of chemicals like RoundUp, pose a serious threat to the microbiome. It’s impossible to know what consequences these types of products might lead to, but the safest course of action is avoid potentially harmful foods whenever you can.

To protect your major organ of detoxification (your liver) you might want to consider supporting your liver. CLICK HERE to learn how.

SOURCES

Environ Sci Eur. 2016; 28(1):3 Trends in glyphosate herbicide use in the United States and globally. Charles M. Benbrook

Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S. Role of the gut microbiota in human nutrition and metabolism. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2012.

 Interdiscip Toxicol. 2013 Dec; 6(4): 159–184. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance. Anthony Samsel and Stephanie Seneff.

How To Go Pro (as in Probiotics)

Let’s learn how to Go Pro (as in Probiotics). Throughout history, fermented foods have provided probiotic bacteria in the diet. All traditional cultures fermented their foods and lived in and with nature. This created an amazing diversity of gut microbes.

WHAT IS FERMENTED FOOD?

Food fermentation dates back more than seven thousand years to wine making in the Middle East. In the United States we are familiar with sauerkraut (fermented cabbage) and yogurt (fermented milk product). Korean-Americans probably have a jar of kimchi in their fridge. We are realizing the amazing health benefits of these microbial foods. CLICK HERE to read my previous blog about Psychobiotics: The Future of Mental Health ( the link between microbes and our mental health).

How To Go Pro (as in Probiotics)

WHAT IS FERMENTATION?

Fermentation is the metabolic process of converting carbohydrates, typically sugars, into other molecules – either alcohols and carbon dioxide or organic acids. The chemical conversion process needs yeast, bacteria (or both) and it takes place in the absence of oxygen. Fermented foods contribute a diverse array of microorganisms to the existing gut microbiota and thus have the potential to affect health.

NOT ALL FERMENTED FOODS ARE THE SAME

While all fermented foods are necessarily made with microorganisms, some
products are subsequently processed by heat or filtration. These steps
are done to extend shelf-life and make the products shelf-stable, but
they also inactivate or remove the organisms. Thus, fermented
vegetables, like sauerkraut or pickles packaged in jars and stored at
room temperature will not contain live cultures. For other fermented
products, like sour dough bread, the organisms do not survive the baking
process. Unfortunately, it’s not always easy for consumers to know
which products actually contain live bacteria. Still, there are plenty
of fermented foods with live cultures, but discerning consumers need to
look carefully at the labels.

Many foods can have probiotic benefits
Cucumbers are great to pickle

WHAT ARE DIETARY SOURCES OF PROBIOTICS?

Here is how to Go Pro (as in Probiotics). Probiotics can be found in:

Yogurt – milk that has been fermented by friendly bacteria, mainly lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria.

Kefir – fermented probiotic milk drink. It is made by adding kefir grains to cow’s or goat’s milk.

Sauerkraut – finely shredded cabbage that has been fermented by lactic acid bacteria.

Tempeh – fermented soybean product. It forms a firm patty whose flavor is described as nutty, earthy or similar to a mushroom.

Kimchi – contains the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus kimchii, as well as other lactic acid bacteria that may benefit digestive health

Kombucha – is a fermented black or green tea drink.

Pickles – cucumbers that have been pickled in a solution of salt and water.

You might also want to supplement with a probiotic supplement to help increase the number of beneficial bacteria that reside in your gut. CLICK HERE for the one I use and recommend.