Recipe for Cauliflower Fried Rice

Cauliflower Fried Rice is so easy to make. Especially when you buy the ingredients all ready to go. Here is the image of what you need.

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 cups of “riced” raw cauliflower (you can buy it fresh in a bag or frozen or rice it yourself)
  • 1/2 cup frozen edamame
  • 1/2 cup carrots, dices
  •  3-4 garlic cloves, minced
  •  1/2 cup onion, diced
  •  1/2 TBSP olive oil
  •  2 eggs (or 4 egg whites) scrambled (if desired)
  •  3 TBSP tamari or soy sauce
  • Diced chicken (if desired)

QUICK AND EASY STEPS

  1. In a large pan, saute garlic and onions in olive oil on a medium/high heat, until onions become soft and transparent. (about 2-3 minutes)
  2. Next add in carrots and cook until carrots begin to soften, about 3-4 minutes
  3. Next stir in scrambled eggs (if desired)  , cauliflower rice and tamari (or soy sauce). Cook stirring frequently for about 5-7 more minutes.
  4. Enjoy adding in your favorite protein and veg. Possible add-ins, chicken broccoli, cabbage, bok choy, water chestnuts, chicken, tofu, and shrimp!

This is delicious, low glycemic, full of healthy fats and good protein and the whole family will love it. I cook it as a full meal and also as a side dish. every time I have made this, people love it.

HOW SMART IS YOUR FOOD?

SMART METAPHORIs your food smart? Here is how you answer this question. Is the food you are choosing based on,

  • Simple and Pure Ingredients?
  • Macronutrients that are balanced?
  • Advanced Fats?
  • Research Validated ingredients?
  • Total personalization to YOUR needs?

One of the keys I have found is to do your menu planning ahead of time and plan your meals and snacks. It is good to always have healthy snacks on hand, healthy smoothie options for our busy life and a shopping list!

I recommend you integrate into your menu planning some SMART MEAL REPLACEMENT SMART BARSshakes and SMART NUTRITION BARS. I love the MY SMART nutrition bars, especially the coconut cashew. Delicious! The label is simple and pure and very satisfying!

Here are some of the label highlights of the MYSMART BARS. Great to have with you!

  • SMART BAR LABEL9-11 grams of protein (Fills you up)
  • 6- 7 grams of fat (half of which is saturated fat from coconut oil)
  • 130 – 150 calories
  • 13-15 grams of Carbohydrates ( 6-9 grams of these are fiber)
  • They taste great!

MY SMART MEAL REPLACEMENT is a great way to make breakfast when you are in a hurry. I have my favorite! I use a cup of Almond SHAKE BASESMilk, Orange Creme Flavor Stick and 2 scoops any of the My SMART Shake bases.

Here are some of the label highlights of MySMART Shake Bases.

  • Zero added Sugar
  • 12 grams of carbohydrate (8 grams of fiber)
  • Low Glycemic Impact
  • 18 grams of Protein
  • CARBS IN MYSMART SHAKE6 grams of fat (4 grams of saturated fat from coconut oil)

These MYSMART foods have clean, pure ingredients that create a beneficial balance of macronutrients—carbohydrates, proteins, and fats mainly from coconut oil. And they support a low-glycemic impact on your body.

You’ll be able to make a balanced meal that perfectly fits to your needs and tastes by mixing in fruit, greens or your favorite healthy ingredients.

Here is Your 1, 2, 3 SMART Food System

  • STEP 1 – Choose Protein Base  – Three protein bases with a mild vanilla flavor—plant, soy, and whey
    STEP 2 – Choose Flavor Optimizer – Five MySmart™ Flavor Optimizers—dark chocolate, cappuccino, peach mango, banana, and orange cream
  • STEP 3 – If you want extra protein or fiber – add – Fibergy and/or MySmart™Shake Protein Plus—new whey protein optimizer
  • STEP 4 – Remember your SMART PROTEIN BARS – Coconut Cashew, Dark Chocolate and Peanut Butter!

I love that you can customize MySmartFoods to work with your dietary needs and support your goals—wherever you are on your journey to optimal health.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER YOUR SMART FOODS – remember to click on VIP pricing so you get the best price

 

 

Could Your Healthy Diet Make Me Fat?

Some fibres examples in a every day food

Some fibres examples in a every day food

Could your healthy diet make me fat? An Israeli study at Weizmann Institute of Science in 2015 about personalized nutrition was heralded by a media frenzy. “This diet study upends everything we thought we knew about ‘healthy’ food,” claimed one headline. The study suggested that dieters may be mistakenly eating a lot of some foods, like tomatoes, that are good for most people, but bad for them. And it raised the possibility that an individualized approach to nutrition could eventually supplant national guidelines meant for the entire public.

Personalized medicine has already become well established in clinical practice. We know that the effects of some drugs vary from person to person and that genetic analysis of tumors can help doctors select the best cancer treatment for a particular patient. Despite the recent fanfare, we have also known for a long time that people respond differently to specific foods based on their genes, past health or other factors.

Standard diets typically fail to produce significant long-term weight loss.  For instance, while a clinical trial published in 2005 of 160 adults randomly assigned to the Atkins, Ornish, Weight Watchers and Zone diets reported modest results in all groups after one year, individuals in those groups experienced weight changes ranging from a loss of 35 pounds or more to a gain of 10 or more.

This variation is commonly attributed to behavior. Some people are simply more motivated and compliant with their assigned diet than others. But suppose the people who did poorly on the low-fat Ornish diet would have done well on the low-carbohydrate Atkins diet because of their biological makeup, and vice versa? If we knew that ahead of time, we could assign everyone the diet that’s best suited for him or her.

Despite the hype, personalized nutrition is not ready for practical application in the clinic. But this exciting field of research may help explain why people respond so differently to diet based on biology. In this way, personalized nutrition may build upon, rather than substitute for, national dietary guidelines, providing a common ground for all sides in the “diet war” to declare a truce.