Could Your Healthy Diet Make Me Fat?

Some fibres examples in a every day food

Some fibres examples in a every day food

Could your healthy diet make me fat? An Israeli study at Weizmann Institute of Science in 2015 about personalized nutrition was heralded by a media frenzy. “This diet study upends everything we thought we knew about ‘healthy’ food,” claimed one headline. The study suggested that dieters may be mistakenly eating a lot of some foods, like tomatoes, that are good for most people, but bad for them. And it raised the possibility that an individualized approach to nutrition could eventually supplant national guidelines meant for the entire public.

Personalized medicine has already become well established in clinical practice. We know that the effects of some drugs vary from person to person and that genetic analysis of tumors can help doctors select the best cancer treatment for a particular patient. Despite the recent fanfare, we have also known for a long time that people respond differently to specific foods based on their genes, past health or other factors.

Standard diets typically fail to produce significant long-term weight loss.  For instance, while a clinical trial published in 2005 of 160 adults randomly assigned to the Atkins, Ornish, Weight Watchers and Zone diets reported modest results in all groups after one year, individuals in those groups experienced weight changes ranging from a loss of 35 pounds or more to a gain of 10 or more.

This variation is commonly attributed to behavior. Some people are simply more motivated and compliant with their assigned diet than others. But suppose the people who did poorly on the low-fat Ornish diet would have done well on the low-carbohydrate Atkins diet because of their biological makeup, and vice versa? If we knew that ahead of time, we could assign everyone the diet that’s best suited for him or her.

Despite the hype, personalized nutrition is not ready for practical application in the clinic. But this exciting field of research may help explain why people respond so differently to diet based on biology. In this way, personalized nutrition may build upon, rather than substitute for, national dietary guidelines, providing a common ground for all sides in the “diet war” to declare a truce.

Do It Yourself Bone Broth

BONE BROTHBone broth is so good for your gut. It contains the minerals of bone, cartilage, marrow and vegetables as electrolytes. It aids digestion and is important for treatment of intestinal disorders (the gelatin in stocks is excellent for nourishing the intestinal lining). Vegetarians can prepare stocks exclusively from vegetables or fish.

Basic Bone-Building Stock

Ingredients:

(for a large batch)

  • 3-4 pounds of organic meat bones (poultry necks & backs, beef marrow and knuckle bones, or other assorted bones)
  • 5-6 quarts of filtered water, or more as needed ¼ cup raw apple cider vinegar
  • 2 bay leaves and/or 2 piece of kelp sea vegetable 2 onions, coarsely chopped
    3 organic carrots, unpeeled and coarsely chopped
  • 3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons black peppercorns
  • 1 bunch of fresh organic parsley

Preparation:

1. Place the bones in a large stock pot with water and vinegar. Let stand for one hour.

2. Add all other ingredients except the parsley.
3. Cover and bring to a boil over medium heat.
4. Reduce heat to medium-low to keep the stock gently bubbling. Skim off any scum that rises to the top during the first 30 minutes.
5. Simmer covered for 8-10 hours and up to 72 hours if desired.
6. Uncover and simmer one hour longer until liquid is reduced to about 4 quarts. Add parsley during the last 10 minutes.

7. Cool completely and strain to remove the bones and vegetables.
8. Continue to cool in the refrigerator and remove the congealed fat that rises to the top.

9. Place in Mason Jars leaving 2” of space at the top. Place in freezer but do NOT tighten the lids (leave lids loose until frozen for expansion). You can also fill an ice cube tray with the stock for small portions.

Basic Vegetable Stock

The best vegetable stock comes from discarded skins and innards of a variety of organic vegetables including:

Potatoes, Onions, Garlic, Carrots, Celery, Spinach, Cucumber skins, Scallions, Zucchini tips, Apples, Bell Peppers, Parsley, Green Beans, Cabbage, Broccoli, Cauliflower. Note: If you use cabbage or celery, use just a small amount since their flavors are dominant.

Experiment with different vegetables to learn which flavors you like best. In the meantime, here is a very simple recipe.

Ingredients: (4 cups)

  • 2 large onions, coarsely chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, coarsely chopped
  • 3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, chopped in large chunks 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4-6 cups of water

Preparation:

1. Place all ingredients into a pot. Bring to a boil.
2. Cover and simmer for 1 hour.
3. Cool completely and strain (a nut milk bag may be used).

HOW TO SAUTE BOK CHOY

2015-07-24 10.48.50Do you know how to Saute Bok Choy? I haven’t ever made this before and I regret that because it is delicious and EASY! Bok choy is a Chinese cabbage and not as popular as the cabbage typically found at markets (red, green, etc.); however, it’s a health food superstar that has the potential to reduce inflammation.

Bok choy is the perfect vegetable for a healthy side dish. This easy recipe is flavored with garlic, ginger, and a drizzle of sesame oil.

Ingredients (9)
• 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 2 medium garlic cloves, minced
• 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger (from 1/2-inch piece)
• 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
• 1 1/2 pounds bok choy (about 2 medium bunches), cleaned, ends trimmed, and cut on the bias into 1-inch pieces
• 1 tablespoon soy sauce
• 1 tablespoon water
• 1/4 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
• Salt (optional)
Instructions
1. In a large frying pan with a tightfitting lid, heat the vegetable oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the garlic, ginger, and red pepper flakes and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant but not brown, about 30 seconds.
2. Add the bok choy and, using tongs, fold it into the garlic-ginger mixture until coated, about 1 minute. Add the soy sauce and water, cover, and cook until steam accumulates, about 1 minute. Uncover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the greens are just wilted, the stalks are just fork tender but still crisp, and most of the water has evaporated, about 2 minutes.
3. Turn off the heat, stir in the sesame oil, and season with salt if desired.

Recipe from www,fortheloveofcooking.com