What Is Prediabetes and Why Should You Care?

What is prediabetes and why should you care? It’s a wake-up call that you’re on the path to diabetes. But it’s not too late to turn things around.

What Is Prediabetes and Why Should You Care?

If you have it (like 86 million other Americans), your blood sugar (glucose) level is higher than it should be, but not in the diabetic range. People used to call it “borderline” diabetes.

86 million Americans are prediabetic. Read up on what labs are important to monitor to make sure you stay clear of our nations biggest health epidemic to date.

Diagnosis

Your doctor will order a fasting blood sugar test.

  • Normal if your blood sugar is less than 100
  • Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 100-125
  • Diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 or higher

Hemoglobin A1c (or average blood sugar) test

This blood test shows your average blood sugar level for the past 2
to 3 months. Doctors can use it to diagnose prediabetes or diabetes or,
if you already know you have diabetes, it helps show whether it’s under
control. The results are:

  • Normal: 5.6% or less
  • Prediabetes: 5.7 to 6.4%
  • Diabetes: 6.5% or above

SOURCE – WEBMD

As it happens, there are very few signs of prediabetes and the condition is largely considered asymptomatic. It often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include:

  • Being overweight
  • Being 45 years or older
  • Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Being physically active less than 3 times a week
  • Ever having diabetes during pregnancy or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Having polycystic ovary syndrome

If you are struggling with carbohydrate cravings, review my Sugar Cleanse as part of your journey to health.

The most commonly overlooked lab tests

Overlooked lab tests you need to ask for
Ask for these tests

Overlooked lab tests you need to ask for is the topic of this blog article. These focus on optimal functioning of the body and its organs, and address core imbalances such as inflammation in the body.

FASTING INSULIN Desired Range: 2 – 5 (ideally under 3)
Insulin is a measure of inflammation in the body. You want to know your fasting glucose as well as your fasting insulin. Fasting insulin is a measure of how much insulin your pancreas is making when you are at rest, and there is no food in your system to stimulate its release. Post meal insulin is also a great tool – measured about 45-60 minutes after a meal.

Overlooked lab tests you need to ask for

HEMOGLOBIN A1C (HBA1C) Desired Range: 4.5 – 5.0
HbA1c provides an indication of the average glucose over previous 3-4 months.

Doctors don’t order HBA1c unless your fasting glucose result goes above 120 when they are concerned about diabetes. I recommend HbA1c as a routine lab test. If it is above 5, then a low glycemic plan like The Sugar Buster Program and lifestyle changes could restore balance.

In case your doctor won’t order the Hemoglobin A1c test for you, it’s available as a home test kit in all major pharmacy chains and online.

LIPOPROTEIN(a) Lp(a)
Another overlooked lab test you need to ask for is Lp(a). It is not included in most standard cholesterol or lipid panels.  A normal level is less than 30 mg/dL (300 mg/L) or less than 75 nmols/L. Levels higher than this are associated with an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, or narrowed arteries supplying blood to vital organs, often at an early age (younger than 55 in men and 65 in women)

About 20% or one in five people have high levels of Lp(a) from birth based on genetic factors they inherited from their parents, and most don’t know they have it. As high levels of Lp(a) travel through the bloodstream, it collects in the arteries, leading to gradual narrowing of the artery that can limit blood supply to the heart, brain, and kidneys as well as the legs. It can increase the risk of blood clots, heart attack or stroke.

If in any doubt, or if requiring medical advice, please contact the appropriate health professional. I recommend consulting with a licensed health professional before making major diet and lifestyle changes.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria? Glyphosate is a chemical that is very useful to farmers because they can spray it all over their fields. The chemical kills weeds, but leaves the resistant crops untouched.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?
?

New evidence suggests that even tiny amounts of the herbicide might be harmful to your friendly bacteria. Some scientists say that leftover herbicide and pesticide on leafy green plants or fruits like apples and pears can end up in the stomach and intestines. There, it makes it harder for bacteria cells to multiply. Since individual bacteria cells don’t live very long, this can end up wiping out entire species.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?

RoundUp has Glyphosate as its active ingredient. Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria? Scientists believe that it is killing bacteria that help people digest gluten, and that is leading to a huge increase in the number of people around the world who suffer from Celiac Disease. It’s that, over the next few decades, scientists will discover more and more diseases that could be connected to RoundUp.

Tips for Protecting Yourself

Peel or wash any fresh produce thoroughly. I soak all fruits (The ones without a hard skin) in water and add some Apple Cider Vinegar (1 teaspoon or less). This helps remove a lot of the pesticides. Rinse well with filtered water and you can’t taste the vinegar at all.

Buy organic fruits and vegetables whenever possible. Organic produce is grown without the use of any harmful chemicals, so choosing organics will protect your friendly bacteria.

Choose GMO-free foods whenever possible. As a general rule, if a food doesn’t explicitly market itself as non-GMO or GMO-free, it probably contains at least some genetically modified ingredients.

Avoid packaged and processed foods. These packaged foods are very likely to be made with one or more genetically modified crops. There’s no way to know.

Genetically modified foods, especially those that have been grown with the help of chemicals like RoundUp, pose a serious threat to the microbiome. It’s impossible to know what consequences these types of products might lead to, but the safest course of action is avoid potentially harmful foods whenever you can.

To protect your major organ of detoxification (your liver) you might want to consider supporting your liver. CLICK HERE to learn how.

SOURCES

Environ Sci Eur. 2016; 28(1):3 Trends in glyphosate herbicide use in the United States and globally. Charles M. Benbrook

Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S. Role of the gut microbiota in human nutrition and metabolism. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2012.

 Interdiscip Toxicol. 2013 Dec; 6(4): 159–184. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance. Anthony Samsel and Stephanie Seneff.