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Lessons from my 10 Days of Plant-Based Eating

My dad was a butcher and I grew up eating and loving meat, So, the plant-based challenge was definitely a challenge for me.I wanted to do it because it makes sense to me that eating a whole food plant based diet is a good way to eat. I love the science of nutrition and I like to “practice what I preach”. I did not consider this a “diet” but a lifestyle choice and I was hoping it would lead me to continuing with some new habits.

What we do know from repeated studies and concrete data is that eating a heavily plant based diet has many health benefits. It’s shown to reduce and or reverse heart disease, diabetes, inflammation, arthritis, auto-immune and more.

For this plant-based experience I had no meat, chicken, dairy, eggs, alcohol or processed food.

What I discovered was not what I expected. I assumed I would release weight as that is what I hear people do that go vegetarian or vegan or raw. That did not happen. In fact the days that I had extra grains like brown rice or quinoa, I gained weight.

Nuts and seeds are a go-to source of protein, but are quite calorie-dense. Good protein sources are lentils, with 18 grams of protein and 230 calories per cup or soft tofu with 16 grams of protein and 150 calories per cup of cubes. It is good to stir-fry, broil, steam or grill these protein options to avoid the extra calories that come from breading or frying. Flavor them with herbs, spices, soy sauce, canned tomatoes, vinegar and citrus, rather than with sugary sauces or fatty dressings.

Here are my personal take-ways so far from my plant-based experience.

    1. Every one has a unique metabolic blueprint and one way of eating does not work for everyone.
    2. Just because a particular food is vegan doesn’t mean it’s automatically healthful or low in calorie.( Soy ice cream, chips, pizza made with refined flour and vegan cheese, white bagels, vegan butter and cream cheese, vegan cookies and cakes are all as calorie-dense as non-vegan versions of these foods.)
    3. I personally do best on a low carbohydrate eating plan.
    4. To go plant based you have to be super organized with your protein sources (nuts, protein powder for shakes, vegetables)
    5. I can gain weight when my carbohydrate content goes higher.
    6. Plant based plans contain a lot of carbohydrates, so I had to choose low glycemic carbs and watch portion sizes.

I’ve always suggested that if we can be more present and aware- more mindful, so that we can become our own best nutritionist. There just isn’t any one diet that is the best and fits all. If I am present and aware, instead of eating unconsciously and in a hurry, then I can pay ore attention to how the food is nourishing me. Does the food you eat provide you energy, or deplete your energy? Do you have mental fogginess or feel more mentally clear? Is your mood more positive or negative? Do you feel normal or bloated? These are all signs… pay attention. If you’re loaded up on caffeine, that is also a sign.

So after this challenge I will definitely be more plant-based than I have been and that was one of my goals going in.

 

Sugar Linked To $1 Trillion In U.S. Healthcare Spending

Sugar addiction concept as a human head made of white granulated refined sweet cubes as a health care symbol for being addicted to sweeteners and the medical issues pertaining to processed food.

An article in Forbes magazine in 2013 highlighted the Credit Suisse report on sugar which is worth highlighting.

30% – 40% of healthcare expenditures in the USA go to help address issues that are closely tied to the excess consumption of sugar.” Credit Suisse Report

Assuming a U.S. National Healthcare Expenditure of $3 trillion per year – and further assuming we simply take 33% (the lower end of the Credit Suisse range), the calculation is easy. Basically, the U.S. healthcare system spends about $1 trillion per year (and possibly more) fighting the effects of excess sugar consumption.

The health effects around that excessive consumption of sugar include coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Other known risks – mostly around being overweight and/or obese – include osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, gout, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer. A broader summary list of findings in the 40 page report include these:

The 2012 Global Burden of Disease report highlighted obesity as a more significant health crisis globally than hunger and/or malnourishment.

More than half a billion adults (over age 20) worldwide are obese.

The world average daily intake of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is now 70 grams (17 teaspoons).

A scientific statement issued by the American heart Association in 2009 recommends that women take no more than six teaspoons of added sugar a day and men no more than nine.

A single, 12 ounce can of regular soda has about 8 teaspoons of sugar.

While the toxic health effects of sugar are generally well known, there is mounting evidence to suggest that sugar has addictive properties as well.

“Sugar may not pose the clear addictive characteristics of illicit drugs such as cocaine and heroin, but to us it does meet the criteria for being a potentially addictive substance.” Credit Suisse

SOURCE : FORBES