Got Tempeh?

Got tempeh?

I was in my favorite Mother’s market today and was so excited get my firm tempeh that I love to saute and use as my plant based protein source.

Want some good plant-based protein sources?

Tempeh is a form of soy that is closer to soy in its whole food form. The vast majority of soy consumed in the U.S. comes from a highly processed form of soy. The soybeans we consume have usually been genetically engineered, cracked, dehulled, crushed, and subjected to solvent extraction to separate their oils from the rest of the bean. What’s left behind after oil extraction (defatted soy flour) is then further processed into animal feed, or processed to produce a protein concentrate or a protein isolate. The isolate can be used as an ingredient in low-fat soymilk, and the concentrate can be further processed (extruded) to form a textured soy protein for use in meat analog products (like soy burgers).

Tempeh is produced with significantly less processing than most low-fat soymilks and soy burgers, and they are soy foods that are much closer to a “whole foods” category than soy protein isolates and concentrates.

Fermentation increases the digestibility of soy (especially its proteins), nutrient absorption from soy  and the concentration of bioactive peptides

Cooked tempeh can be eaten alone, or used in chili, stir fries, soups, salads, sandwiches, and stews. Tempeh’s complex flavor has been described as nutty, meaty, and mushroom-like. It freezes well, and is now commonly available in many western supermarkets, as well as in ethnic markets and health food stores.

The Power of Nutrigenomics

Nutrigenomics is the study of how genes and nutrients interact. We have finally been able to put the science to the idea that we’re all different. We respond in a different way to the environment, to diet, to trying to lose weight, to exercise training. But we never really understood the science behind it. Genetics gives us that information

Nutrigenomics is the study of gene behavior that is driven by diet, lifestyle, environment, drugs, pharmaceuticals, stress. Nutrigenomic education, accreditation, certification is becoming more accepted.

Precision wellness would happen if wellness professionals started looking at somebody’s genomics in a comprehensive way. This would reveal predispositions and where they’re likely to have problems and what issues are likely to arise for them. We can possibly customize  dietary recommendations, customize exercise recommendations and customize other behavioral and lifestyle interventions that would be likely to help based on genomics. Wellness professionals could work at the front end and speed up the process of doing the diet, behavioral, and lifestyle interventions when consultations have begun with this information.

Nutrigenomic information never exists in isolation. It needs to be understood in the context of all the lifestyle habits.

The shift in mindset from genetics to genomics is similar to the shift from an allopathic mindset into more of a functional systems-based medicine mindset. Genetics looks at a single layer of information. Genomic impact is where we look at many factors, complex interventions ending with complex results.

People are starting to want to understand themselves. How is it relevant to me? How does it change me? How do I respond?

 

CHALLENGES

  1. Ancestry genetics is interesting but the power is in the nutrition and the diet and environment and stress management and movement, changing gene expression, altering epigenetics
  2. Explosion of genetic tests available in the marketplace. Everyone is kind of on the genetics bandwagon. The concern is about direct-to-consumer, supplement-based testing
  3. A good genetics test looks at key issues in understanding the kind of functional nature of an individual . This includes, detoxification inflammation methylation
  4. Consideration has to be given to how people interact with disease information and whether that should be direct-to-consumer.
  5. it’s so easy to buy a 23AndMe test and it’s so affordable, people line up with kind of a false expectation of what they’re going to do with their data.
  6. Psychosocial anxiety around the information patients are given. We’re not evaluating patients for their medical and clinical history.
  7. treating SNPs with particular protocols is over
  8. It can be used as a way of ignoring or diminishing the importance of changes to diet, lifestyle, and behavior.
  9. Can be a source of disempowerment and overwhelm that actually paralyzes people and keeps them from taking meaningful actions

When Food Is Love

Food is love. I just completed  a LIVE call with 20 participants in my September Sugar Buster Program.

The topic tonight was about our relationship to food  and how to heal it. I wanted  to share this topic with you as I don’t think many people are sharing this.

A book I recommend is by Geneen Roth and it is called “When Food Is Love“.

I the book, Geneen explores why many people overeat in an attempt to satisfy their emotional hunger, and why weight loss frequently just uncovers a new set of problems. But her welcome message is that change is possible. This book helped me break destructive, self-perpetuating patterns and learn to satisfy all the hungers—physical and emotional—that make us human.

Geneen’s personal story and those of her clients highlight the meaning of food addiction.

I shared tonight that my Sugar Buster Program is really about love. Loving ourselves enough to feed our body with the most nourishing diet that enlivens our lives. I asked a few questions tonight that you might find helpful for your own reflection.

      1. What role does food play in your  life?
      2. What role does food play in your emotional gratification?
      3. What insights have you gained this week about your relationship to food?
      4. What new habits would you like to start relating to food?
      5. What is weighting you down in your life?