It’s Been a Rough Year for Sugar

It’s been a rough year for sugar. In my previous blog HERE, I wrote about  the article published in health journal Obesity that  found sugary beverage consumption down 20% in children and 10% in adults from 2003. Fruit juice and sodas took major hits, replaced at the popular table by coconut water and seltzers. Coconut water consumption increased 228% worldwide from 2011 to 2016. Seltzer sales grew from $2.6 billion in 2011 to a projected $8.5 billion last year, led by La Croix, the staple of the suburban Midwest turned cult beverage

Here are some other “BAD” news stories about sugar

  1. PepsiCo announced they would buy home seltzer maker SodaStream  (“a good hedge” said Mad Money’s Jim Cramer!),
  2. Coca-Cola announced they would acquire the 4,000-store Costa Coffee chain
  3. Starbucks announced they’re beginning to test a lower sugar Frappuccino  because even  tweens have started to question the logic behind consuming 67 grams of sugar in one sitting.

When three of the biggest drink manufacturers in the world each make a move  away from the sugary thing that originally made them giant drink manufacturers, we’re reaching a tipping point.

 

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels?

Checking your  blood glucose (sugar) levels makes a difference when it comes overall health awareness. I like to teach my clients about 4 main ways to test their blood sugar and I will explain each way and the “target” levels for each.

  1. Fasting before a meal (Preprandial)
  2. After a meal – Postprandial PPG
  3. Random
  4. Hemoglobin A1c Test (HbA1c)

Let’s review each one.

1. FASTING BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS

After fasting, a person without diabetes or prediabetes will have a blood sugar between 70 to 99 mg/dL, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). If a person has a diagnosis of diabetes, ADA’s target range for home checks of fasting, or premeal blood sugars is between 80 to 130 mg/dL. ADA does not yet have specific testing targets for prediabetes, so ask your doctor for guidance. However, people with prediabetes should try to achieve readings at least within the diabetes target range.

However, depending on your personal health condition, your doctor may set preprandial glucose readings that are different than these guidelines, so make sure you know what numbers you’re aiming for.

2. AFTER A MEAL –  Postprandial glucose (PPG) levels — meaning ‘sugar after the meal’ — give you more important information about how the body is able to manage glucose after a meal

If you do not have diabetes or , your blood sugars may rise only slightly after meals — typically not exceeding 140 mg/dL when checked 2 hours after the start of a meal.

If you have diabetes, ADA recommends post-meal blood sugars stay below 180 mg/dL. If your readings exceed this, you may be able to improve them. For instance, blood sugar can often be reduced by eating smaller meals, choosing healthful, high fiber foods, increasing physical activity, and by taking prescribed diabetes medications on time. If your readings are consistently above target, work with your doctor and diabetes care team to discuss solutions. Dr. Kumar, an assistant professor of endocrinology at the University of Texas at Austin says

“Glucose levels begin to rise about 10 minutes after the start of a meal and peak two hours after a meal. The glucose levels [then] return to pre-meal levels within two to three hours.”

3. RANDOM BLOOD SUGAR TEST

This test is completed at random intervals during the day. It doesn’t matter what or when you ate, and whether or not you have exercised at all. If the reading is between 80mg/dl and 140mg/dl, then your blood glucose is normal.

REFERENCE – www.livestrong.com/article/265900-normal-blood-sugar-range-after-meals/

4. HEMOGLOBIN A1c

Often abbreviated often abbreviated HbA1c, is a form of hemoglobin (a blood pigment that carries oxygen) that is bound to glucose. The A1C test measures your average blood glucose during the previous 2-3 months, but especially during the previous month. For people without diabetes, the normal A1C range is 4 – 6%. For people with diabetes, an A1C value below 7% greatly lowers health risks.

CLICK HERE TO JOIN MY NEXT SUGAR CLEANSE BEGINNING OCTOBER 15 2018

Is Sugar Addiction Real?

Sugar addiction concept as a human head made of white granulated refined sweet cubes as a health care symbol for being addicted to sweeteners and the medical issues pertaining to processed food.

For many of us, sugar is addictive. That’s because foods high in sugar trigger the reward centers of your brain.

The Lay’s potato chip  advertising company were really onto something when they developed their “betcha can’t eat just one” slogan in the 1950s. Talk about ahead of their time!

Eric Stice, Ph.D., a neuroscientist at the Oregon Research Institute has used MRI scans to conclude that sugar activates the same brain areas that are activated when a person consumes drugs like cocaine. In addition, he found that heavy users of sugar develop tolerance (needing more and more to feel the same effect), which is a symptom of substance dependence.

Women are twice as likely to be addicted to food as men (2)

Women tend to diet, restrict, and binge more than men, which seems to trigger the brain to overeat addictively. Interestingly, women with the greatest hormonal upheaval at perimenopause report the highest rates of food addiction(2).

When food is off-limits, it tends to take on power and value, so it is good to ease into getting off the sugar roller coaster.  Eating protein is an easy way to curb sugar cravings. High-protein foods digest more slowly, keeping you feeling full for longer. Protein doesn’t make your blood sugar spike the way refined carbs and sugars do. Pick proteins like lean chicken, low-fat yogurt, eggs, nuts, or beans. Fiber also helps fight a sugar itch in many ways. First, it keeps you full. High-fiber foods also give you more energy. Because they don’t raise your blood sugar, there’s no hungry crash after. Choose fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Or smear some peanut butter on an apple for a protein/fiber combo.

REFERENCES

1, P. Pedram et al., “Food Addiction: Its Prevalence and Significant Association with Obesity in the General Population,” PLoS ONE 8, no. 9 (2013): e74832, doi:10.1371/ journal.pone.0074832.

2. A. J. Flint et al., “Food- Addiction Scale Measurement in 2 Cohorts of Middle- Aged and Older Women,” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 99, no. 3 (2014): 578–86, doi:10.3945/ajcn.113.068965.