Want to Try Intermittent Fasting?

Want to try Intermittent Fasting? I am sure you have heard the term as it has become as popular lately as the keto diet! I decided to try it and I started it last week and want to share my experience.

What Is Intermittent Fasting?

Intermittent fasting is an eating pattern where you cycle between periods of eating and fasting. There are many different types of intermittent fasting. I am trying the 16/8 method which is 16 hours of fasting and only eating within an 8 hour time window (usually 12 noon to 8pm works for me personally).

What Are the Benefits?

Of course I had to research the “proven” benefits and here are some. See if any of these resonate with you.

  1. Blood levels of insulin drop significantly, which facilitates fat burning.(1)
  2. Gene expression: There are beneficial changes in several genes and molecules related to longevity and protection against disease. (2)
  3. Facilitates fat burning and muscle gain. (3)
  4. Short-term fasting actually increases your metabolic rate by 3.6-14%, helping you burn even more calories. (4)
  5. When we fast, the cells in the body initiate a cellular “waste removal” process called autophagy. (5)
  6. Several studies in rats have shown that intermittent fasting may increase the growth of new nerve cells, which should have benefits for brain function. (6)

My Experience So Far

Like all my lifestyle goals. It is important to me that I live a balanced life and I am not “gritting my teeth” trying to make myself do something. Eating dinner at night with my husband is an important part of our day, so I decided that an 8pm – 12 noon fasting period was best for my lifestyle. Here is the raw truth. I am hungry as soon as a wake up in the morning , so I truly didn’t know if I could go until 12 noon without eating.

Want to Try Intermittent Fasting?

Surprisingly, I actually feel better on the days I do make it to 12 noon before I eat! I have dropped a few pounds that I just couldn’t budge. Maybe this is from eating less calories and being more mindful of what I am eating. I am optimistic at this new tool I have! We will see!

  1. American Journal of Nutrition 2005 Jan;81(1):69-73.)
  2. Ageing Resrev 2006 Aug :5(3):332-353
  3. New England Journal of Medicine 1990 Jul 5;323(1):1-6.
  4. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2000 Jun;71(6):1511-5.
  5. Autophagy 2010 Aug 16; 6(6): 702–710.
  6. Journal of Mol Neuroscience 2000 Oct;15(2):99-108.

Sitting May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise

Sitting May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise

Sitting may sabotage the benefits of exercise. As I write this, I am wanting to stand up! Sitting for most of the day could make us resistant to the usual benefits of exercise, according to a small but worrying new study.

The study is titled “Inactivity induces resistance to the metabolic benefits following acute exercise” and published in The Journal of Applied Physiology in April 2019.

People who spend most of their waking hours sitting face heightened risks for many chronic diseases. They often also experience metabolic problems that raise the risk of diabetes and heart disease, including insulin resistance, poor blood sugar control and high levels of triglycerides, the fatty acids from food that linger in the blood if they are not metabolized.

The researchers asked the volunteers to stop moving around so much and instead confine themselves to fewer than 4,000 steps a day and at least 13 hours of remaining still.

The volunteers complied, sitting, almost uninterrupted, for four days in a row.

They also changed their diets slightly, consuming fewer calories, so that they would not gain weight, which might have changed their metabolisms, separately from the sitting.

Sitting May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise

These results suggest that being sedentary for long periods of time may create conditions inside our bodies “that make us resistant to the usual metabolic improvements after acute exercise,” says Edward Coyle, a professor of kinesiology at UT-Austin and senior author of the new study.

Sitting May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise

Is sitting unhealthy for us primarily because we are not exercising when
we are sitting? Or does sitting have its own unique effects on our
bodies and, if so, could those outcomes somehow alter or even overpower
the positive contributions of exercise?

The Conclusion

He and his colleagues hope to explore some of those issues in future studies. But even now, he says, the data indicate that “it is a very good idea not to sit all day.”

SOURCE
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2019 Apr 1;126(4):1088-1094. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00968.2018. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

What Is Prediabetes and Why Should You Care?

What is prediabetes and why should you care? It’s a wake-up call that you’re on the path to diabetes. But it’s not too late to turn things around.

What Is Prediabetes and Why Should You Care?

If you have it (like 86 million other Americans), your blood sugar (glucose) level is higher than it should be, but not in the diabetic range. People used to call it “borderline” diabetes.

86 million Americans are prediabetic. Read up on what labs are important to monitor to make sure you stay clear of our nations biggest health epidemic to date.

Diagnosis

Your doctor will order a fasting blood sugar test.

  • Normal if your blood sugar is less than 100
  • Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 100-125
  • Diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 or higher

Hemoglobin A1c (or average blood sugar) test

This blood test shows your average blood sugar level for the past 2
to 3 months. Doctors can use it to diagnose prediabetes or diabetes or,
if you already know you have diabetes, it helps show whether it’s under
control. The results are:

  • Normal: 5.6% or less
  • Prediabetes: 5.7 to 6.4%
  • Diabetes: 6.5% or above

SOURCE – WEBMD

As it happens, there are very few signs of prediabetes and the condition is largely considered asymptomatic. It often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include:

  • Being overweight
  • Being 45 years or older
  • Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Being physically active less than 3 times a week
  • Ever having diabetes during pregnancy or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Having polycystic ovary syndrome

If you are struggling with carbohydrate cravings, review my Sugar Cleanse as part of your journey to health.