Sugar Linked To $1 Trillion In U.S. Healthcare Spending

Sugar addiction concept as a human head made of white granulated refined sweet cubes as a health care symbol for being addicted to sweeteners and the medical issues pertaining to processed food.

An article in Forbes magazine in 2013 highlighted the Credit Suisse report on sugar which is worth highlighting.

30% – 40% of healthcare expenditures in the USA go to help address issues that are closely tied to the excess consumption of sugar.” Credit Suisse Report

Assuming a U.S. National Healthcare Expenditure of $3 trillion per year – and further assuming we simply take 33% (the lower end of the Credit Suisse range), the calculation is easy. Basically, the U.S. healthcare system spends about $1 trillion per year (and possibly more) fighting the effects of excess sugar consumption.

The health effects around that excessive consumption of sugar include coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Other known risks – mostly around being overweight and/or obese – include osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, gout, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer. A broader summary list of findings in the 40 page report include these:

The 2012 Global Burden of Disease report highlighted obesity as a more significant health crisis globally than hunger and/or malnourishment.

More than half a billion adults (over age 20) worldwide are obese.

The world average daily intake of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is now 70 grams (17 teaspoons).

A scientific statement issued by the American heart Association in 2009 recommends that women take no more than six teaspoons of added sugar a day and men no more than nine.

A single, 12 ounce can of regular soda has about 8 teaspoons of sugar.

While the toxic health effects of sugar are generally well known, there is mounting evidence to suggest that sugar has addictive properties as well.

“Sugar may not pose the clear addictive characteristics of illicit drugs such as cocaine and heroin, but to us it does meet the criteria for being a potentially addictive substance.” Credit Suisse

SOURCE : FORBES 

Do You Have a Glucose Meter?

I recommend everyone purchase their own glucose meter as part of their “wellness tracking”.

Digital health and personalized wellness is so popular now and more people are  interested in managing their own health by changing lifestyles and healthier living.

This is your “Fitbit for blood sugar”.

Since the research is showing how blood sugar levels between 105 and 120 can have inflammatory effects on the body, I recommend you know your numbers! Test your blood sugar fasting as well as directly after a meal and 2 hours after. Experiment with different foods.

I checked at Costco today about the price. The actual glucometer is about $12 and the lancets and test strips are the expensive part. I have attached a photo of mine here.

Test strips are far and away the most expensive aspect of using a blood glucose meter. Prices on test strips can range anywhere from $8 to $50 or more per box of 50. Some manufacturers with more expensive strips offer co-pay assistance programs to help drive the cost of test strips down into this range.

If your glucometer is simple to use, you’re more likely to test as often as you should. For most users that means a bright, easy to read screen, buttons that are easy to handle, forgiving test strips and a reasonably small blood sample.

We now know that even in healthy people, high blood sugar after meals can, over time, damage the body, even if it never causes diabetes. In short, it’s no longer just certain people who need to worry about their blood sugar; it’s pretty much everyone. It should concern you even if you’re thin and healthy, and especially if you don’t get much exercise

CLICK HERE to learn about my Sugar Buster Program.

Acid Blocking Drugs and Your Brain

The Microbiome Summit this week has been full of amazing cutting edge information. One message that I want to share and have you spread the message is about the use of the common acid blocking drugs (often used for reflux).

Dr David Perlmutter presented on “Healthy Messages from Body to Brain. Dr Perlmutter  is  a board certified neurologist and Fellow of the American College of Nutrition. He is a four-time New York Times bestselling author with his book published in twenty-nine languages. Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs and Sugar, has over one million copies in print.

His most recent book, Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain for Life, is also a New York Times bestseller.

The information I want to share with you is so important to share and it comes direct from his lecture.

“An article in The Journal of American Medical Association Neurology,  demonstrated that people who chronically take these very common acid blocking drugs, over the counter or as a prescription, are associated with a 40% increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.”

Stomach acid activates digestive enzymes and allows us to absorb Vitamin B12. The acid produced in the stomach sets the right level of pH for the entirety of the digestive system, home to over 100 trillion organisms.

These risks may be increased because of changes in the gut bacteria that happen when acid levels are reduced. So once again, threatening the microbiome may well pave the way for health consequences.

Another study he quoted was from Stanford researchers who called attention to the significant increase (16-21% higher) in risk for heart attack in users of protein pump inhibitors.

He tells us that there are times when these drugs are necessary. There are some medical conditions in which there truly is an increased production of stomach acid, and there are conditions, like Barret’s esophagus and ulcer disease, in which reducing the production of stomach acid is worthwhile.

Read more at Dr Perlmutter’s web site and consult your own doctor. I am simply sharing information.

Dr Permutter has great information on his website at http://www.drperlmutter.com
The contents of this blog are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This blog does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.