Want to Try Intermittent Fasting?

Want to try Intermittent Fasting? I am sure you have heard the term as it has become as popular lately as the keto diet! I decided to try it and I started it last week and want to share my experience.

What Is Intermittent Fasting?

Intermittent fasting is an eating pattern where you cycle between periods of eating and fasting. There are many different types of intermittent fasting. I am trying the 16/8 method which is 16 hours of fasting and only eating within an 8 hour time window (usually 12 noon to 8pm works for me personally).

What Are the Benefits?

Of course I had to research the “proven” benefits and here are some. See if any of these resonate with you.

  1. Blood levels of insulin drop significantly, which facilitates fat burning.(1)
  2. Gene expression: There are beneficial changes in several genes and molecules related to longevity and protection against disease. (2)
  3. Facilitates fat burning and muscle gain. (3)
  4. Short-term fasting actually increases your metabolic rate by 3.6-14%, helping you burn even more calories. (4)
  5. When we fast, the cells in the body initiate a cellular “waste removal” process called autophagy. (5)
  6. Several studies in rats have shown that intermittent fasting may increase the growth of new nerve cells, which should have benefits for brain function. (6)

My Experience So Far

Like all my lifestyle goals. It is important to me that I live a balanced life and I am not “gritting my teeth” trying to make myself do something. Eating dinner at night with my husband is an important part of our day, so I decided that an 8pm – 12 noon fasting period was best for my lifestyle. Here is the raw truth. I am hungry as soon as a wake up in the morning , so I truly didn’t know if I could go until 12 noon without eating.

Want to Try Intermittent Fasting?

Surprisingly, I actually feel better on the days I do make it to 12 noon before I eat! I have dropped a few pounds that I just couldn’t budge. Maybe this is from eating less calories and being more mindful of what I am eating. I am optimistic at this new tool I have! We will see!

  1. American Journal of Nutrition 2005 Jan;81(1):69-73.)
  2. Ageing Resrev 2006 Aug :5(3):332-353
  3. New England Journal of Medicine 1990 Jul 5;323(1):1-6.
  4. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2000 Jun;71(6):1511-5.
  5. Autophagy 2010 Aug 16; 6(6): 702–710.
  6. Journal of Mol Neuroscience 2000 Oct;15(2):99-108.

The most commonly overlooked lab tests

Overlooked lab tests you need to ask for
Ask for these tests

Overlooked lab tests you need to ask for is the topic of this blog article. These focus on optimal functioning of the body and its organs, and address core imbalances such as inflammation in the body.

FASTING INSULIN Desired Range: 2 – 5 (ideally under 3)
Insulin is a measure of inflammation in the body. You want to know your fasting glucose as well as your fasting insulin. Fasting insulin is a measure of how much insulin your pancreas is making when you are at rest, and there is no food in your system to stimulate its release. Post meal insulin is also a great tool – measured about 45-60 minutes after a meal.

Overlooked lab tests you need to ask for

HEMOGLOBIN A1C (HBA1C) Desired Range: 4.5 – 5.0
HbA1c provides an indication of the average glucose over previous 3-4 months.

Doctors don’t order HBA1c unless your fasting glucose result goes above 120 when they are concerned about diabetes. I recommend HbA1c as a routine lab test. If it is above 5, then a low glycemic plan like The Sugar Buster Program and lifestyle changes could restore balance.

In case your doctor won’t order the Hemoglobin A1c test for you, it’s available as a home test kit in all major pharmacy chains and online.

LIPOPROTEIN(a) Lp(a)
Another overlooked lab test you need to ask for is Lp(a). It is not included in most standard cholesterol or lipid panels.  A normal level is less than 30 mg/dL (300 mg/L) or less than 75 nmols/L. Levels higher than this are associated with an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, or narrowed arteries supplying blood to vital organs, often at an early age (younger than 55 in men and 65 in women)

About 20% or one in five people have high levels of Lp(a) from birth based on genetic factors they inherited from their parents, and most don’t know they have it. As high levels of Lp(a) travel through the bloodstream, it collects in the arteries, leading to gradual narrowing of the artery that can limit blood supply to the heart, brain, and kidneys as well as the legs. It can increase the risk of blood clots, heart attack or stroke.

If in any doubt, or if requiring medical advice, please contact the appropriate health professional. I recommend consulting with a licensed health professional before making major diet and lifestyle changes.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria? Glyphosate is a chemical that is very useful to farmers because they can spray it all over their fields. The chemical kills weeds, but leaves the resistant crops untouched.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?
?

New evidence suggests that even tiny amounts of the herbicide might be harmful to your friendly bacteria. Some scientists say that leftover herbicide and pesticide on leafy green plants or fruits like apples and pears can end up in the stomach and intestines. There, it makes it harder for bacteria cells to multiply. Since individual bacteria cells don’t live very long, this can end up wiping out entire species.

Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria?

RoundUp has Glyphosate as its active ingredient. Is Glyphosate Destroying Gut Bacteria? Scientists believe that it is killing bacteria that help people digest gluten, and that is leading to a huge increase in the number of people around the world who suffer from Celiac Disease. It’s that, over the next few decades, scientists will discover more and more diseases that could be connected to RoundUp.

Tips for Protecting Yourself

Peel or wash any fresh produce thoroughly. I soak all fruits (The ones without a hard skin) in water and add some Apple Cider Vinegar (1 teaspoon or less). This helps remove a lot of the pesticides. Rinse well with filtered water and you can’t taste the vinegar at all.

Buy organic fruits and vegetables whenever possible. Organic produce is grown without the use of any harmful chemicals, so choosing organics will protect your friendly bacteria.

Choose GMO-free foods whenever possible. As a general rule, if a food doesn’t explicitly market itself as non-GMO or GMO-free, it probably contains at least some genetically modified ingredients.

Avoid packaged and processed foods. These packaged foods are very likely to be made with one or more genetically modified crops. There’s no way to know.

Genetically modified foods, especially those that have been grown with the help of chemicals like RoundUp, pose a serious threat to the microbiome. It’s impossible to know what consequences these types of products might lead to, but the safest course of action is avoid potentially harmful foods whenever you can.

To protect your major organ of detoxification (your liver) you might want to consider supporting your liver. CLICK HERE to learn how.

SOURCES

Environ Sci Eur. 2016; 28(1):3 Trends in glyphosate herbicide use in the United States and globally. Charles M. Benbrook

Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S. Role of the gut microbiota in human nutrition and metabolism. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2012.

 Interdiscip Toxicol. 2013 Dec; 6(4): 159–184. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance. Anthony Samsel and Stephanie Seneff.